Monthly Archives: May 2017

Demise of Loyal Retail Customers in the Digital Age

Loyal retail customers have for long now given Bricks and Mortar (BM) retailers an advantage over their competitors. However, the advent of the internet and the subsequent development of the online shopping channel have changed the shopping behaviour of retail customers.

Although BM retailers have invested millions of dollars in customer loyalty programs, the convenience, speed and assortment of products customers enjoy online lured many loyal customers away. This is apparent with the closedown of thousands of retail stores, and the vanishing of well-known retail brands over the last couple of years.

The big challenge for BM retailers is to the get customers back to their stores. Thereafter, the retailers should have a strategy in place to keep them coming back. In other words, making their customers loyal again…

What are loyal retail customers?

Customer loyalty is according to PR Loyalty Marketing both an attitudinal and behavioral tendency to favor one brand over all others. This may be due to satisfaction with the product or service, its convenience or performance, or simply familiarity and comfort with the brand.

Loyalty is formed in four stages 1 – cognitive, affective, conative, and action.

  1. Cognitive loyalty – in the first loyalty stage, consumers develop value expectations and preference for one brand relative to other available alternatives.
  2. Affective loyalty – here the consumers begins to develop a liking or attitude towards the brand based on an increasingly satisfying experience with the brand.
  3. Connotative loyalty – the third stage, which is confined to consumer’s behavioral intention. The consumer has deeply held commitment to buy the brand.
  4. Action loyalty – is where the desire and intention in the previous loyalty state has translated into realistic loyalty actions or behaviour.

It takes time, money and commitment from retailers to get loyal retail customers. This process, mostly took place at the BM retailer’s store in the local shopping center. However, retail customers in the digital age can shop anywhere, at any time, at the best price.

So, BM retailers need to rethink their customer loyalty programs. They need to find out what “delights” their customers. How has the internet and the online retail channel affected their shopping behaviour in the retail stores?

Loyal retail customers in multi-channel retail

Retailers can nowadays rely only on more than one channel to do business with. As a result, most BM retailers adopted eCommerce to become Bricks and Clicks retailers. Online retailers, on the other hand, started to open physical stores to serve as showrooms for their products. Indeed, loyal retail customers need to be found outside the traditional retail channels.

“In the digital age, your customers have apps that let them search for products, compare products, review products, check prices, compare prices, and even buy the product without ever stepping foot in your store “says Tiffany Marshall. So what must retailers do to get their loyal retail customers back?

Media Genesis suggests that retailers do the following to get back loyal retail customers:

  • Build an emotional connection – whether it’s through exclusive content or rewards, making your consumer feel special is an important part of brand loyalty.
  • Personalize – you have your customer’s data; use it to your advantage! Make your content relevant and engaging by making sure that it is (almost) custom-made for your consumer.
  • Use your data – use data, analytics, and your digital business capabilities to go beyond just rewards. Use the information you’ve gathered to really analyse how your consumers want to engage with your brand and build a strategy to do it.
  • Create an active online presence – forgoing a good website and a strong online presence is essentially a death sentence in today’s digital marketplace. Most consumers prefer to shop online and not having an easy to use website is like excluding your brand from the conversation. It’s not enough to just post on social media. Create conversations, respond to customers, and help make customer service a 360° experience.
  • Merge your worlds – make the online to offline experience completely complimentary by identifying all of the crucial touch points you may have with your consumers. You might even see a return in foot traffic if the consumer consistently sees your brand attached to good prices online. When they need something in a pinch, your brand will be at the top of their mind.
  • Make it easy – as a business, you now have to prioritize delivering quality, enjoyable interactions with your consumers. This is the best way to build a lasting customer relationship in the digital age. If your web presence does some of the heavy lifting for your consumer, making it easier for them to reach their end goal, the quality of the experience will resonate and they’ll be back for more.

Concluding

Online shopping caters to the busy lifestyle of modern people, and its prevalence manifests the rise of the stay-at-home economy 2. Also, the internet, big data, the internet of things and social media has revolutionized the way customers interact with their retailers. I wonder, however, how loyal retail customers can be towards a chatbot?

Lastly, has the demise of the loyal retail customer started?

Read also: Personalization of Marketing Communication – not just for your Customer’s sake

Have look at this video: “The role of customer loyalty in the small business”

Notes

1 Kursunluoglu, E. 2014. Shopping centre customer service: creating customer satisfaction and loyalty, Marketing Intelligence & Planning, 32(4):528-548.

2 Wu, M.Y. and Tseng, L.H. 2015. Customer satisfaction and loyalty in an online shop: an experiential marketing perspective, International Journal of Business and Management, 10(1):104.

Image and video

Flickr.comlynda.com

Drop Shipping in 2017 – Opportunities and Turbulence for Retailers

Drop shipping in 2017: Is drop shipping the ‘holy grail’ for struggling Bricks Mortar retailers? Or is it a retail business model that goes against what online customers demand: An easy, consistent and seamless experience.

According to Joel Padi writing in The Market Mogal, the young people in the UK choose increasingly to become entrepreneurs. This is because of the unpredictable economy, high study fees and a fiercely competitive job market. Joel says that some of the young entrepreneurs consider drop shipping as a “risk-free, low start-up cost, and profitable business venture”.

Josh Wexler, CEO and Founder of RevCascade, posting in the MULTICHANNELMERCHANT says that “Thanks to its inherent flexibility and low-risk nature, drop shipping has the potential to be your ultimate tool for merchandising and product curation”. However, Ed Kennedy cautions that with drop shipping, a retailer may put his/her good reputation in another’s hands. A real concern…

The drop shipping in 2017 will be discussed – does it offers opportunities for retailers, or is it too troublesome?

The drop shipping distribution model

The drop shipping distribution model is usually contrasted with the traditional retail distribution model. Comparing the two models is not without a good reason. Traditional retail distribution models require the retailer to buy inventory, and to store and manage it. This practice needs a monetary investment that serves as an important entry barrier to the industry.

There is no need for a retailer to buy inventory, or to handle it when using drop shipping.  Since the capital requirements starting a drop ship retail business is small, the barrier to enter the industry is low. Therefore, starting a drop ship business seems easy, but how easy is it to keep it open?

The pros and cons of drop shipping in 2017

Drop shipping, as with any other retail business model, has its advantages and disadvantages:

The advantages of using drop shipping for existing retailers are according to Josh Wexler as follows:

  • Increasing volume with existing brands – launching a drop ship program largely takes the responsibility of shipping and fulfillment off your shoulders;
  • Selling new products from new (and existing) brands – your product mix and brand offerings can be drastically expanded and diversified with virtually no risk;
  • Testing new verticals – drop shipping can mitigate risk to the point where retailers can test out merchandising with entirely new verticals, not just products and brands;

The disadvantages for retailers using a drop shipping system are according to Strategy Plus:

  • Processing your orders can become difficult. The time between selling a product and getting it shipped can take long. Also, there are many conversations and actions that need to take place before it gets sent off;
  • Not having all of the product information is problematic. As you never actually handle the products that you are selling, you have no realistic idea of what they are like;
  • Customer service issues. Drop shipping removes the responsibility of shipping but, sadly, it also removes a large part of the customer experience from your control;
  • A vast amount of competition is everywhere. Finding great drop shipping products means they generally will come with competition from other retailers in your sector.

How should retailers practice drop shipping in 2017

In a time where many Bricks and Mortar retailers are closing shops because changes in the buying behaviour of their customers, a drop shipping distribution model may provide an outcome. Indeed, drop shipping has the power to build a retailer’s eCommerce site and increase product offerings with little capital investment.

However, Peter Zaballos, Chief Marketing Officer at SPS (quoted in the MULTICHANNELMERCHANT) suggests that before retailers decide to add drop shipping capabilities, they should consider the following six questions:

  1. Do I have the infrastructure needed to support it? Drop shipping involves many moving parts and requires flawless orchestration between retailers and suppliers. Communication, collaboration and efficiency are key to meeting the promise made to consumers.
  2. Do I have the right internal resources in place? Managing the increased document flow drop shipping requires may tax your internal teams. It’s critical that you have systems and processes that can support increased volume.
  3. Which of my suppliers have drop shipping capabilities? While having a relationship with a supplier that offers drop shipping makes it easier to add this component to your merchandising strategy, it is not a necessity.
  4. How will I receive reliable, accurate product information? Today’s digital consumers rely on detailed product information when making purchasing decisions. To ensure you provide such information, gather item attributes from your suppliers.
  5. How will I maintain service levels? Drop ship agreements require collaboration and trust in order to ensure customer expectations are met. From the start, foster and encourage open dialogue and set expectations, requirements and goals.
  6. In what way will I manage returns? Even with accurate product information and a good shopping experience, returns are inevitable and must be planned for. First, determine what to do with merchandise that is returned. Will it go back to the warehouse or the supplier, be discounted and sent to store shelves or sold elsewhere?

Concluding

Although the start-up costs are low with a drop shipping business, it’s not so easy to run it. Websites such as Dropship.com and Shopify as well as other applications run by the wholesale suppliers will mostly give entrepreneurs a seamless start. However, what happens there after will require all the ‘guts’ and determination to keep going.

Then there is the ‘the paradox of choice’. Jeremy Hanks, CEO of Dsco said recently in Practical Ecommerce that “customers overwhelmed by product variety end up just window shopping.” Joel Padi writing in The Market Mogal advises that when starting with drop shipping, specialization in a niche market could prove to be the key to a profitable start-up. By reducing their focus, first-time entrepreneurs can narrow the target market, reducing advertising and marketing costs.

Finally, to do successful drop shipping in 2017, the retailer must maintain control over the entire customer experience, including how transactions and communications take place, says Adrien Nussenbaum, co-founder of Mirakl (Internet Retailing).

Image: Pixabay

Read also:  Drop shipping retail in 2016

 

 

Predictive Analytics helps Retailers to make sense of Big Data

“The most successful retail companies are utilizing data science and predictive analytics (PA) to improve efficiency, improve marketing campaigns, and gain significant customer insight for a competitive advantage” says Christine Kern, contributing for Innovative Retail Technology. But what about the “not so successful” retailers? How can they share in the advantages that Big Data and PA offer? Retailers can – by using predictive analytics.

What is Predictive Analytics?

Predictive analytics is a set of business intelligence technologies that uncovers relationships and patterns within large volumes of data that can be used to predict behaviour and events, according to Eckerson (2007) 1. Or, as Eckerson states it more bluntly “Predictive Analytics is like an “intelligent” robot that rummages through all your data until it finds something interesting to show you.”

Also, forecasting is about predicting the future, and predictive analytics adds questions regarding what would have happened in the past, given different conditions. Therefore, PA attempts to quickly and inexpensively approximate relationships between variables while still using deductive mathematical methods to draw conclusions 2.

Gregg Brunnick, Director of Product Management & Technical Services, Business Systems Division, Epson America explains the usefulness of PA: “If you know how many cheeseburgers John sold during last Tuesday’s lunch hour, for instance, you can improve the efficiency of your food ordering, preparation, labor, and marketing operations.”

The value of Predictive Analytics for retailers

Deon Abott of Smarter HQ writing in Inside Big Data, suggests that data science and predictive modeling have become the holy grail for the retail industry. For this reason retailers built reports summarizing customer behavior using metrics such as conversion rate, average order value, recency of purchase and total amount spent in recent transactions.

These measurements provided general insight into the behavioral tendencies of customers. However, says Deon “In order for retailers to create a meaningful dialogue with customers that honors the shopper’s preferred level and mode of engagement, it takes more than summarized reports, which is why customer intelligence and predictive analytics provide the opportunity to significantly change the retail marketing industry.”

Generic uses of Predictive Analytics are according SAS the following:

  • Detecting fraud. Combining multiple analytics methods can improve pattern detection and prevent criminal behavior. As cyber-security becomes a growing concern, high-performance behavioral analytics examines all actions on a network in real time to spot abnormalities that may indicate fraud.
  • Optimizing marketing campaigns. Predictive analytics are used to determine customer responses or purchases, as well as promote cross-sell opportunities. Predictive models help businesses attract, retain and grow their most profitable customers.
  • Improving operations. Many companies use predictive models to forecast inventory and manage resources. Predictive analytics enables organizations to function more efficiently.
  • Reducing risk. Credit scores are used to assess a buyer’s likelihood of default for purchases and are a well-known example of predictive analytics. A credit score is a number generated by a predictive model that incorporates all data relevant to a person’s creditworthiness.

Erick Siegel of Big Think suggests that predictive analytics allows for a keen assessment of the probability that any one person will buy, sell, click, lie, die, etc. PA doesn’t just predict the future; it can influence it as well.

The challenges of using Predictive Analytics

The big challenge for retailers is to use PA correctly. Not using PA appropriately can cause loss of brand equity and market share with astonishing speed. The key is in understanding the customer’s “digital body language”, suggests Earley (2014) 3. Retailers need to understand customer data – the attributes, needs, characteristics, life stage, behaviour, demographics, and psycho-graphics. The information coming from the data may be used to help customers behave in a way that satisfies their needs 3.

Unfortunately, the use of PA by some retailers has been reported as controversial. Not only are most companies not informing their customers of when and what data they are collecting, but they are not letting them know about their analysis policies, according to Corrigan et al (2014) 4.

According to Arliss Coates from EConsultancy retailers should note the following when using PA:

  • Is automation driving out your innovation and originality?
  • Do you have people that know how to interpret the results of PA?
  • Scenario planning – humans cannot prepare the machines to anticipate every possible nuance or scenario.
  • An over-reliance on data to substantiate decision-making may hampers innovation.
  • The “garbage in, garbage out” principle – bad data will render bad results.

Concluding

The explosion of data is here to stay. At this moment it seems that the availability and use of big data and predictive analytics will grow exponentially. In spite of some controversy and challenges, PA couldn’t have come at a better time for retailers. Predictive analytics may help retailers to integrate their channels more smoothly and thereby keeping in pace with their competitors.

Read also: Big Data for Small Retailers – Is it Doable?

Have a look at this practical demonstration of PA from IBM “”Predictive Analytics for Retail – Introduction”:


Notes

1 Eckerson, W.W. 2007. Predictive Analytics. Extending the Value of Your Data Warehousing Investment, TDWI Best Practices Report, Q1.

2 Waller, M.A. and Fawcett, S.E. 2013. Data science, predictive analytics, and big data: a revolution that will transform supply chain design and management, Journal of Business Logistics, 34(2):77-84.

3 Earley, S. 2014. Big Data and Predictive Analytics: What’s New? IT Professional, 16(1):13-15.

4 Corrigan, H.B., Craciun, G. and Powell, A.M. 2014. How does target know so much about its customers? Utilizing customer analytics to make marketing decisions, Marketing Education Review, 24(2):159-166.

Image

Pixabay

Video

IBM