Category Archives: Internet Marketing

Website Analytics Helps You to See How Your Online Business is Performing

Website Analytics is there for retailers to use. You’ve just decided to start an online retail business. Why not? It’s relatively easy and cheap to do. You can start a Drop Shipping business, or join Shopify or trade your own goods online with a Woocommerce site. According to Quora, there are between 12 and 24 million ecommerce websites on the net. However, only about 650,000 ecommerce websites generate annual sales of more than $1,000. That’s a miserable 2.7% generating very modest turnovers.

Is your online business not performing as planned? Are your paid search adverting and social media marketing campaigns not resulting in sales? Then you’re probably targeting the wrong customers at the wrong place with the wrong products. So how will you know that you’re doing things wrong? You can do the right thing by using a Website Analytics tool such as Google Analytics.

What is Website Analytics?

Web analytics is the process of analyzing the behavior of visitors to a Web site. Indeed, the use of Web analytics is said to enable a business to attract more visitors, retain or attract new customers for goods or services, or to increase the dollar volume each customer spends, says Margaret Rouse in Techtarget.com.

Web Analytics is not just a process for measuring web traffic but can be used as a tool for business and market research, and to assess and improve the effectiveness of a website, according to Salini, Malavolta and Rossi (2016).

Salini et al (2016) mentioned that the four essential stages of Website Analytics are:

  1. Collection of data,
  2. Processing data into information,
  3. Developing Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), and
  4. Formulating an online strategy.

Each of these stages impacts or can impact the stage preceding or following it; in other words they are sequentially connected and not isolated from each other.

  1. Collecting data for Web Analytics

The simplest, cheapest and most used Web Analytics tool is Google Analytics (GA). Indeed, Google analytics offers a free service to its users. But before you can use GA, you need to create a new account. GA will create a tracking code that you can copy into the memory of your website. Your website should now be connected with Google Analytics.

However, your site needs traffic in order for GA to do its algorithms and results. Therefore you need to write a post or promote products to start attracting visitors.

  1. Processing data into information

Google Analytics can track a visitor’s location, device, landing page, and behavior while he or she is using your website. In addition, you can see where the visitor came from (Google, Bing, Yelp, etc.). This can help you to spend those pay-per-click marketing dollars wisely.

Kristi Hines suggests in his blog Kissmetrics.com that Google Analytics help you as follows:

  • Find out which online campaigns bring the most traffic and conversions.
  • Determine where your best visitors are located.
  • Learn what people are searching for on your site.
  • Visualize what people click on the most.
  • Uncover your top content.
  • Identify your worst performing pages.
  • Determine where people abandon the shopping cart.
  • Discover if you need a mobile site.

Before you start perusing the pie charts, line graphs, and spreadsheets available in the user interface of Google Analytics, it’s important to figure out what to monitor.

  1. Developing Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

Since you’ve identified what works and what does not work with your website, you need to develop KPIs. A KPI, or Key Performance Indicator, is a metric used to measure performance. Drew Strojny of The Theme Foundry advised that SMEs and bloggers using WordPress to keep the following ideas in mind when identifying website-related KPIs:

  • KPIs should align with business goals. The KPIs related to your website should align with a specific action you want website visitors to take. In many cases, this will be a revenue-impacting action, like contacting you for a quote if you’re a service provider.
  • KPIs should correspond to trackable metrics in Google Analytics. Therefore, when you know what your KPIs are, you should connect each one to a specific tool or tool in Google Analytics.

The top 8 metrics and KPIs that online retailers should take into account with website analytics are according to Natalie Pavlovskaya writing in InstantShift:

  1. Average Order Value (AOV). AOV is considered a key metric by many online retailers, because the higher you can encourage AOV to be, the more income your store will get. The basic calculation is: (Sum of Revenue Generated)/(# of Orders) = Average Order Value
  2. Conversion Rate. The conversion rate tells how effective your store is at closing deals. The basic calculation is: (Number of Sales) / (Number of Visits) = Conversion Rate.
  3. Bounce Rate. Bounce Rate is a percentage of visitors who leave your site immediately, probably because they didn’t find what they were looking or the website was too complicated or annoying to use. The basic calculation is: (Number of visitors who leave immediately) / (Total number of visitors) = Bounce Rate.
  4. Shopping Cart Abandonment Rate. According to the Baymard Institute, the average shopping cart abandonment rate is 69% (2017). The basic calculation is: (#of people who don’t complete checkout) / (# of people who start checkout) = Shopping Cart Abandonment Rate.
  5. Cost per Acquisition. Cost per Acquisition is a critical marketing metric. It can tell you which campaigns can drive your sales and which will become a costly pile. The basic calculation is: (Total Cost of Marketing Activities) / (# of Conversions) = Cost per Acquisition.
  6. Traffic. Where does your audience come from? Which channels produce the most customers? What social networks, keywords work best for your business?
  7. Net Profit. Net Profit is the actual amount of profit a business generates after all expenses. It tells you the profitability of your ecommerce business after taking all costs into account. The basic calculation is: (Total Revenue) – (Total Expenses) = Net Profit.
  8. Customer Lifetime Value (LTV). Customer Lifetime Value measures the total amount of money a customer spends in a store during his relationship with it. The basic LTV equation: (Average Order Value) x (# of Repeat Sales) x (Average Retention Time).

Once you’ve got the overall picture of your online store’s performance, you’ll need to formulate or change your online business strategy.

  1. Formulating an online strategy

Formulating an actionable online strategy for your business may be your biggest challenge. Sarah Williams Founder & CEO of 816 New York proposed the following steps to develop a Google Analytics Measurement Plan:

  • Step 1. Document your business’s objectives. Ask yourself as a company: Why do we exist? What is the Core Purpose and Vision of the brand itself?
  • Step 2: Identify strategies and tactics. One Strategy you would adopt is to sell products. The tactics that support that strategy, then, might be to sell online through the website, sell items in stores, or sell via a mobile shopping app.
  • Step 3: Choose KPIs. For an e-commerce site, the KPIs (measurements of strategies and tactics) might include monitoring how much revenue has been generated, and the average order value from online and mobile app sales.
  • Step 4: Choose segments. It’s important to segment your data to drill down to its essence. Not all customers are the same, and it’s often helpful to segment your reporting to identify distinct market segments.
  • Step 5: Choose targets. You must define the targets for each KPI. What indicates success? Where can you do better? Isn’t that what you want to find out, after all?
  • Step 6: Implement and control. Monitor the data regularly to adjust your tactics with the trends.

A Google Analytics result page

Concluding

Lastly, one of the greatest advantages having an ecommerce website is that you can measure the activity and the behaviour of users. However, there is no advantage if you don’t measure the performance of your website and marketing strategies. Therefore, make sure that you target the right customers with the right products at the right places, and, o yes – the right prices. For that reason mastering website analytics tools such as Google Analytics may bring you close to achieve all your KPI goals. Good luck with your website analytics!

A last word from Albert Einstein “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.”

Read also:

  1. Predictive Analytics helps Retailers to make sense of Big Data
  2. Marketing Automation is enabled by Artificial Intelligence, Big Data and Chatbots

Note

Salini, A., Malavolta, I. and Rossi, F. 2016. Leveraging web analytics for automatically generating mobile navigation models, In Mobile Services (MS), 2016 IEEE International Conference, 103-110.

Images

Pixabay.com

Flickr.com

 

Implementing Social Customer Relationship Management in Retail

One of the most important goals for retailers is to maintain long-term and profitable relationships with their customers. The construct Customer Relationship Management (CRM) started when retailers moved the orientation of their business from their companies to their customers. However, the advent of the internet, Web 2.0, and online social networks have disrupted the traditional way that retailers communicated with their customers.  Hence, Social Customer Relationship Management (SCRM) came to the fore because of the emergence of a “social customer”.

Social customers comprise the 2.8 billion* active social media users (Dr Dave Chaffey *, Smart Insights, 27 Apr, 2017). With these billions of social media users, retailers are no longer in control of customer relationships. Instead, customers and their highly influential virtual networks are now driving the conversation, which can trump a retailer’s marketing, sales and service efforts with their unprecedented immediacy and reach 1. However, social media needn’t to be a threat for retailers. Indeed, retailers that learn how to use social media technology to their advantage can gain valuable insights about the demographics and buying behaviour of their customers.

The use of technology for successful Social Customer Relationship Management

Social networks offer retailers practicing Social Customer Relationship Management masses of customers who group themselves around a brand 2. It is here, in these networks, that retailers can study the community’s behavior toward a brand or firm beyond purchase. The data originate from motivational drivers such as word-of-mouth activity, recommendations, customer-to-customer interactions, blogging, and the writing of reviews 3.

But retailers haven’t yet realized the opportunities of using their own data resources for Social Customer Relationship Management. Sandra Gittlen, mentioned  the following recently in CIO: “In an age where most companies have a social media presence on platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Snapchat and Instagram, it’s somewhat surprising that many still haven’t figured out how to turn the data gathered from company-owned properties and broader social media listening tools into automated and actionable intelligence”.

Trainor, Andzulis, Rapp and Agnihotri, (2014) 4 identified four functional blocks enabled by social media technology that are particularly relevant in a CRM context:

  1. Sharing – refers to technologies that support how users exchange, distribute, and receive digital content (e.g., coupons, texts, videos, images, “pins” on Pinterest, etc.). This is similar to the concept of information reciprocity – the activities and processes that encourage customers to interact and share information – which has been shown to positively influence a firm’s ability to manage relationships.
  2. Conversations – represents technologies that facilitate a firm’s interactive dialog with and between customers (e.g., blogs, status updates on Facebook and Twitter, discussion forums, etc.) and capture the information from these dialog.
  3. Relationships – represents the set of technologies that enables customers (and businesses) to build networks of associations with other users (e.g. Facebook, LinkedIn, Ning, Yammer, etc.) and allows organizations to utilize this network information.
  4. Groups – represents the set of technologies that support the development of online user communities centered on specific topics, brands, or products. Examples include SalesForce.com’s Ideaforce and Igloo’s Customer Community application software.

Integrating your Social Customer Relationship Management program with your marketing automation

SCRM deals with the strategies, processes and technologies that retailers can use to link the social web with their CRM strategy. According to Reinhold and Alt, (2012) 5, SCRM poses a challenge for large firms with numerous employees, market offerings and offices. Consequently, they need to discover the relevant conversation threads, synchronize information flows, initiate the appropriate actions and communicate at an individual level within millions of social web conversations.

However integrating SCRM with marketing automation is not impossible – you only need to start right. Malinda Wilkinson (DestinationCRM.com) advises that it’s important that your technology should always follow your process, not precede it. “Without this integration, it is difficult to create a consistent experience for your prospects and customers. And on top of that, too much time and too many resources will be drained trying to coordinate activities to ensure leads don’t fall through the cracks”, concludes Malinda.

Fitting your Social Customer Relationship Management program with your business philosophy

The success of an effective CRM system depends on the background marketing methods and business philosophy 2 of retailers. Therefore customer centricity should become the new strategic goal, where retailers build their brand and image together with their customers.

Linda Shea in AdAge.com proposes the following to become and remain a customer centric company:

  • Executives need direct interaction with customers. The key to executive buy-in, commitment and active support is first-hand knowledge and understanding of what is delivered to the customer, relative to their needs and desires.
  • All employees need to embody the intended customer experience. A narrative must be cascaded down to every single individual in the organization. Your employees must clearly understand their role in delivering the promise the narrative makes to the end customer.
  • Just say “no” to off-strategy ideas. Excitement abounds in most organizations with ideas and fresh thinking that may lead to new revenue streams. However, it is imperative to recognize that customer-centricity is not a destination but rather a multi-faceted, multi-year journey that will require laser-sharp focus, commitment and investment.

Concluding

Retailers that are not with their customers on the social networks will soon run out of customers. The Social Customer Relationship Management construct is customer centric by definition, giving retailers the opportunity, with the aid of marketing automation, to be part of the social media cloud.

Further reading:

  1. Finding Customers in the Vastness of the Internet
  2. Predictive Analytics helps Retailers to make sense of Big Data
  3. Demise of Loyal Retail Customers in the Digital Age

Notes:

1 Heller Baird, C. and Parasnis, G. 2011. From social media to social customer relationship management, Strategy & Leadership, 39(5):30-37.

2 Bagó, P. and Voros, P. 2011. Social customer relationship management, Global Journal of Enterprise Information System, 3(3):35-46.

3 Yoon, K. and Sims, J.D. 2014. Integrating Social Media and Traditional CRM: Toward a Conceptual Framework for Social CRM Practices, Harnessing the Power of Social Media and Web Analytics, IGI Global, Chapter 5:103-131.

4 Trainor, K.J., Andzulis, J.M., Rapp, A. and Agnihotri, R. 2014. Social media technology usage and customer relationship performance: A capabilities-based examination of social CRM, Journal of Business Research, 67(6):1201-1208.

5 Reinhold, O. and Alt, R. 2012. Social Customer Relationship Management: State of the Art and Learnings from Current Projects. In Bled eConference, 155-169.

Image:

Flickr.com

 

Augmented Reality in Retail – a Useful Customer Experience

Not so long from now. There is an eerie quietness in the retail store.  Almost all the customers are wearing identical glasses and head sets, slowly walking through the aisles like humanoid robots. No, it’s not a new episode of Star Trek in the making – this is Augmented Reality (AR) in action.   Retailers are now experimenting with AR to get customers back in the stores.

What is Augmented Reality?

Augmented reality is the practice of augmenting a real-time direct or indirect view of the physical world with virtual information 1. Scholz and Smith (2016) describe the practice of AR as: “Marketers layering digital information (e.g., text, pictures, and videos) over objects and spaces in the physical world (e.g., product packaging, advertisements, or street scenes). And consumers experiencing these hybridized realities via digital screens (e.g., smart phones or video installations) or projections (e.g., holograms)”.

AR can also be explained as the co-existence of virtual and real in the same space, as well as the interactive alignment and mutual registration of computer generated sources with physical reality 2.

Scholz and Smith (2016) have identified the five ingredients of AR:

  1. AR content – is virtual information that is often perceived by consumers through digital devices (e.g., smart phones, large-screen AR installations);
  2. Users – are the people who directly experience an AR layer. Users can share the same physical space. For example, if a screen displays an augmented view of the street behind a bus stop (e.g., bogus window paradigm). Or they may view the same AR layer while dispersed across different locations – for example, when readers of a magazine access the AR content of an active print;
  3. Bystanders – are people who do not experience an augmentation themselves but instead observe a user’s actions either directly – by sharing the same physical space – or indirectly – by viewing content (e.g., images) that a user has generated during his or her augmented experience. Bystanders can affect users’ willingness to engage in AR experiences because they form the social context of the experience;
  4. Targets – are entities in the physical world that are augmented with digital information. In many cases, targets are objects; for example, a marketer might digitally overlay a brand narrative or ingredient information on product packing. Targets may also be people – for example magic mirrors in fitting rooms that superimpose digital images of their merchandise over live images of customers;
  5. Background – those objects and ambient conditions that share the same physical space as the target, but that are not augmented in this particular AR layer.

AR has the potential to be a life-changing technology application. In a recent interview by Bloomberg, CEO Tim Cook of Apple said: “We’ll all have AR experiences every day, almost like eating three meals a day. It will become that much a part of you.” What is the value of AR for the retailer?

Augmented Reality in retail

AR can help Bricks and Mortar retailers to let their customers enjoy their shopping experience and come back for more. Shauna Heller writing in Media Leaders propose that retailers offer headsets for people to wear while in their stores, to guide people through the store with pop-up characters, animations, or even a virtual assistant right through the visor popping up as people walk around. According to Augment.com, AR helps in the following ways to stop buyer uncertainty:

  • Proximity, presence, and interaction – a customer who is shopping for home furnishings can launch models of a bed or lamp to see how the item would actually look and fit (to scale), rather than playing a guessing game. AR advocates for purchases with more certainty and satisfaction.
  • Modify or customize selections – Augmented Reality makes it easy for consumers to explore their options and make personalized modifications.
  • Visualize or understand products and features – a customer must be able to understand and visualize how a product works and functions. AR augment sophisticated demonstrations that make it easier for customers to visualize and understand the intricate features of a product before they purchase.

AR marketing campaigns open new possibilities for brands to engage and interact with consumers, especially those from social media generations. Yaoyuneyong 3, et al found that AR is “immersive, persuasive and powerful” and the two benefits of AR marketing that they’d identified are:

  1. Enhancing communication by engaging and increasing consumers’ level of immersion and
  2. Improving sales strategy and sales processes.

Also, augmented reality can make a difference to the shopping experience for both online and offline retail customers.

Concluding

After all, it took a game like Pokémon GO and millions of people with smartphones a couple of years ago to bring Augmented Reality under the spotlight. However, the real value of AR is not just for the entertainment of its users, but also as a dynamic marketing tool for retailers.

Remember Pokémon GO?

Further reading

  1. How successful are Retailers in the Omnichannel?
  2. Bricks and Clicks Retail – Shopping Experience makes the Difference

Notes

1 Scholz, J. and Smith, A.N. 2016. Augmented reality: Designing immersive experiences that maximize consumer engagement, Business Horizons, 59(2):149-161.

2 Javornik, A. 2016. Augmented reality: Research agenda for studying the impact of its media characteristics on consumer behaviour, Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, 30:252-261.

3 Yaoyuneyong, G., Foster, J., Johnson, E. and Johnson, D. 2016. Augmented Reality Marketing: Consumer Preferences and Attitudes Toward Hypermedia Print Ads, Journal of Interactive Advertising, 16(1):16-30.

Image and video

  1. shortfilmwindow.com
  2. Pokémon GO

Personalization of Marketing Communication – not just for your Customer’s sake

Personalization of marketing communication is not just a good practice for retailers, but also a way to help their businesses survive. The advent of the internet has rendered retailers the opportunity to offer their customers products specifically customized for them. This is in direct contrast with mass marketing where the objective is to broadcast product offerings to reach the largest number of people possible.

Personalization of marketing communications is to treat each person as a unique individual with distinctive needs and to provide them with customized solutions 1. To be able to personalize marketing communications, retailers need to learn about the customer’s individual needs and preferences in terms of the types of content that the customer is willing to receive and other person-specific characteristics.

The strategic use of data collected during the online buying process and social media sites may be a good starting point for retailers to know their customers better.

Data – the foundation for the personalization of marketing communication

The digitalization of the entire advertising industry is generating ever increasing amounts of data that must be collected, analysed and interpreted 2.  Lying hidden in all this data is information, potentially useful information that is rarely made explicit or taken advantage of. We must just find the data.

The data we need is right before our eyes. Says Woopra: “Social media interactions, email marketing, landing pages, surveys, customer relationship management (CRM) tools, and re-targeted ads are all customer touch points that can tell you about your customer’s needs and interests”.

Once the data are sorted and tabled, retailers can segment and target their customers and also position their products accordingly. However, here the process is done for each customer specifically according the individual’s unique needs, desires and behaviors (customization). So, once customization has been achieved, it makes personalization of marketing communication possible.

Personalized marketing communications used by online retailers

Online shopping has become an important channel for retailers. Unfortunately, it does not afford facile development of an interpersonal relationship or facilitate easy interactions between buyers and sellers 3.  Even worse, many retailers use the online channel to send generic marketing messages via email or text, to the annoyance of their customers. This, however, is not personalized marketing communication.

Retailers need to collect and analyse data about the buying behaviour of individual customers. The profile of the customer will provide guidelines for the retailer how to personalize his/her marketing communication message. Daniel Newman, CEO of Broadsuite Media Group suggests the following ways brands can use data to build personalized marketing tactics:

  • Capture complete data – are you collecting every piece of data that you possibly can? Brands today have more consumer information at their fingertips than ever before, and they can use that data to get to know their customers in depth.
  • Social data – social cues and signals are excellent ways to figure out more about customers than traditional sources like email, demographics, or purchase records.
  • Segmentation – you need to segment your audience into smaller groups for more accurate targeting.

What does a personalized marketing message looks like?

You’ve done all the hard work by sourcing and sorting your customer data. Now it is time to create a personalized marketing message for your customer. Below is an image from GIGYA, a customer identity management agency. The ad shows beauty products that are specifically recommended for a customer with a unique skin type and facial features.

Note that the narrative is in the second person – thus the ad is addressing the individual personally.

The advantages of personalized marketing communications

Retailers that personalize their marketing communication may enjoy the following advantages says Infor Marketing Management:

  1. Improved Return on Investment (ROI) – one study found that personalized website experiences resulted in an average 19% increase in sales. For email, personalization is even more powerful, generating transaction rates and revenue six times higher per email than non-personalized emails.
  2. Outflanking the competition – with personalization, retailers can increase the impact of each interaction to get consumers’ attention and time online – at the cost of the competitors.
  3. Customers expect it – most consumers said it’s important to receive relevant offers when shopping online. And, almost a third wants more personalization during their online shopping experiences, reports Infor Marketing Management.

Concluding

“Personalization is retail’s future; especially as more advanced technologies allow marketers to handle personalization more effectively”, suggests Infor Marketing Management. However, retailers have to invest in the right technology, including marketing automation, CRM, social media management and data analytics tools, as well as more advanced e-commerce platforms.

Bringing the person back into the marketing message may help soften the total onslaught of marketing atomization by means of the internet of things, big data and bots.

Have a peek at this short video from Evergage re personalized marketing communication.

Notes

1 Järvinen, J. and Karjaluoto, H. 2015. The use of Web analytics for digital marketing performance measurement, Industrial Marketing Management, 50:117-127.

2 Grether, M. 2016. Using Big Data for Online Advertising Without Wastage: Wishful Dream, Nightmare or Reality? GfK Marketing Intelligence Review, 8(2):38-43.

3 Lee, Y.J., and Dubinsky, A.J. 2017. Consumers’ desire to interact with a salesperson during e-shopping: development of a scale, International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, 45(1):20-39.

Read also:

  1.  Chatbots in Retailing – a Fact or a Fad?
  2.  Retail and the Internet of Things

Images and video

  1. Pixabay
  2. GIGYA,
  3. Evergage

Word of Mouth Marketing for Better or for Worse

Word of mouth (WOM) is one of the most important communication channels that customers use to discuss retail shops and brands. WOM is informal, frequent and important and the outcomes can be beneficial or disastrous for a brand or a retailer.

Word of mouth has a huge impact on consumer behaviour. Social talk generates over 3.3 billion brand impressions each day and shapes everything from the movies consumers watch to the websites they visit 1. A study by Bughin, Doogan, and Vetvik (2010) 2 suggest that “word of mouth is the primary factor behind 20 to 50% of all purchasing decisions and generates more than twice the sales of paid advertising”.

However, negative WOM can quickly cause havoc with a brand or a retail shop. The advent of the internet, together with social media platforms has changed how peers communicate their experience with brands and shops.  A single bad experience shared by a customer on a social media website, may hurt your brand or business badly.

For retailers to use WOM strategically as a marketing tool, they must first understand why customers discuss your business. Why do they praise or criticize your brand?

Customer conversations aka ‘word of mouth’

Customers love to talk about their shopping experiences because they need to share and receive information, have social interactions, or express emotions 3.

Lu-Shien, living in San Francisco, USA had this to say on the Yelp review site about a new restaurant in their neighborhood: “The vibe, the serving ware, the food. All of it is presented in a modern fresh bistro style. A simple menu with a few headliner items – just the way I like it.” Maybe Lu-Shien has said enough to fill the restaurant to capacity because WOM is perceived by consumers as more credible than, and free from the bias of, firm-to –consumer communications 4.

Sometimes, however, customer reviews aren’t that positive. Said Ali D, from New Orleans, USA also on Yelp about a clothing store “You know, I’ve bought and sold here a few times over the course of a few years, but today’s experience means I will not be going back. I had questions but could not – really – get the attention of the sales girls, because they were having the ultimate bitchy conversation at full volume in front of several customers.”

Nevertheless, according to Ken Davenport writing in The Producers Perspective, only 8% of brand-related word of mouth conversations are “mostly negative”. Hence, the average online review is 4.3 stars out of 5. But what about the customers saying nothing online, and just walk away from your business? Ken suggests that 9 in 10 word of mouth conversations about brands are offline.

Therefore, there is no respite for retailers keeping their customers happy.

Word of mouth marketing – the retailer’s response

Retailers need to take word of mouth marketing seriously, especially now that is taking place in the cyber space. Silverman (2010) 5 identified the following properties that make word of mouth a powerful marketing tool:

  • Credibility – its independence makes it the most powerful, influential, and persuasive force in the marketplace;
  • It is an experience-delivery mechanism;
  • It becomes part of the product itself;
  • WOM is custom-tailored, more relevant, and complete;
  • It is self-generating, self-breeding, and grows exponentially, sometimes explosively;
  • Because it is virtually unlimited, word of mouth happens fast and big;
  • WOM can originate from a single source, or a relatively small number of sources;
  • It is extremely dependent on the nature of the source;
  • Word of mouth can be very inexpensive to stimulate, amplify, and sustain.

If word of mouth has such a big influence on image and profits, then surely retailers should make it part of the marketing strategy.

Silverman suggests taking advantage of these properties, retailers should look at:

  • What is the content of the word of mouth?
  • Who is originating the word of mouth (its sources)?
  • Who is receiving it?
  • What are the channels through which it travels?

“When we understand the answers to these questions, we’ll be ready to look at how to trigger a chain reaction leading to an explosion: how to get it started, how to amplify it, how to channel it, and how to cause it to go in our direction”, proposes Silverman.

Have a look at this video from The Word of Mouth Marketing Association:

Concluding

Getting people to talk about your brand and shop is the way to go. The most important rule of WOM marketing is to “be interesting” and that “nobody talks about boring companies, boring products, or boring ads.” 6 But, word of mouth also has a sharp end. So, retailers need to make WOM work, like a marriage, ‘for better or for worse’ (preferably for better).

Notes:

1 Berger, J. 2014. Word of mouth and interpersonal communication: A review and directions for future research. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 24(4):586-607.

2 Bughin, J., Doogan, J. and Vetvik, O.J. 2010. A new way to measure word-of-mouth marketing. McKinsey Quarterly, 2:113-116.

3 Lovett, Mitchell J., Renana Peres, and Linli Xu. 2016. There’s No Free Lunch Conversation: The Effect of Brand Advertising on Word of Mouth. Marketing Science Institute.

4 Thomas, V.L. and Saenger, C.  2017. Promoting or protecting my brand: The identity-expression and fear-of-imitation conflict, Journal of Consumer Marketing, 34(1).

5 Silverman, G. 2011. Secrets of word-of-mouth marketing: how to trigger exponential sales through runaway word of mouth, AMACOM Div American Mgmt Assn.

6 Berger, J. and Schwartz, E.M. 2011. What drives immediate and ongoing word of mouth? Journal of Marketing Research, 48(5):869-880.

Image and video:

  1. Pixabay.com
  2. WOMMA

Pay-Per-Click Advertising – The Landing Page

The landing page is the place where a customer ends up when clicking on a retailer’s pay-per-click ad. It is here where the customer will decide to engage further or to leave the site.

The landing page is so important that Google’s AdWords ranks each advertisers’ landing page. The ranking affects your Ad Rank and therefore your cost-per-click and position in the ad auction.

Starting your landing page

Your customers should have a great experience when arriving at you landing page. Google advise the following:

  1. Offer relevant, useful and original content.
    1. Make sure your landing-page is directly relevant to your ad text and keyword.
    2. Provide useful information on your landing page about whatever you’re advertising.
    3. Try to offer useful features or content that are unique to your site.
  2. Promote transparency and foster trustworthiness on your site.
    1. Openly share information about your business and clearly state what your business does.
    2. Explain your products or services before asking visitors to fill out forms.
    3. Make it easy for visitors to find your contact information.
    4. If you request personal information from customers, make it clear why you’re asking for it and what you’ll do with it.
    5. Distinguish sponsored links, like ads, from the rest of your website’s content.
  3. Make mobile and computer navigation easy
    1. Organize and design your page well, so people don’t have to hunt around for information.
    2. Make it quick and easy for people to order the product mentioned in your ad.
    3. Don’t annoy customers with pop-ups or other features that interfere with their navigation of your site.
    4. Help customers quickly find what they’re looking for by prioritizing the content that’s visible above-the-fold.
  4. Be fast—decrease your landing page loading time
    1. Make sure your landing-page loads quickly once someone clicks on your ad, whether on a computer or mobile device.
    2. Learn how you or your webmaster can use PageSpeed Insights to measure the performance of your landing page.
  5. Make your site (even more) mobile-friendly
    1. See how your site scores on mobile-friendliness and speed, and find out how to improve it.

Getting your landing page wrong can cost you lots of money. Visit eBizplan for help with your digital marketing strategy.

Picture: videezy.com

Creating ADs for Pay-Per-Click Campaigns

To design and create ads for your pay-per-click marketing campaign remain a challenge. Retailers only have a small space to fit in a meaningful message that will appear on the result page.

Many retailers are selling similar products online. You need to create an ad that is different and catches the attention of online visitors. It may be helpful to search your products on the internet to see how your competitor’s pay-per-click ad looks.

Analyse your competitors

Retailers need to know how their competitors position their products. Start analysing by listing the advantages your competitors claim. Examples of advantages that your competitors may have are:

  • Lower prices;
  • Higher quality;
  • Free delivery;
  • A large selection;
  • A workable return policy.

How do your business compare?

Analyse your own product offering

Compare the positioning of your products with that of your competitors to see where you have an advantage. You may also revisit the feedback from your customers to get an idea what they think about your products and service.

Retailers should identify what their customers want from their products. What are the benefits that your products offer to their users? Once you have identified the benefits, you can create your ad.

Creating the ADs

Retailers should create a sense that visitors will suffer, or fail to benefit, if they don’t act right away. The only objective of the ad is to get visitors to click on it.

Try to speak directly to the visitor by using words like ‘you’ and ‘your’. People usually respond better to ads when they are personalised. Tell people exactly what they should do when they read your ad by using words such as ‘get’, ‘see’, ‘find’, ‘buy’, etc. Make sure that the people know exactly what you are selling…

I will discuss the ‘landing page’ – the page where the visitor arrive when clicking on your ad – in a future blog.

Visit eBizplan if you want help with your digital marketing campaign.

Note

Szetela, D. and Kerschbaum, J. 2010. Pay-per-click search engine marketing: An hour a day. John Wiley & Sons.

Pay-Per-Click Advertising – Getting the Keywords Right

Choosing the wrong keywords for your pay-per-click advertising marketing campaign will show little results and may cost retailers a lot of money. Keyword research is one of the most important tasks to do when retailers prepare for their pay-per-click campaigns on Google’s AdWords.

The way to be successful with pay-per-click has previously been discussed by this author: http://bricks2clicks.co.za/successful-pay-per-click-advertising/. Keywords will now be discussed in more detail.

How to find the right keyword(s)

Retailers need to understand their online customers and should try to get into their minds to find out what words they will type into the search engine box to find your brands or products. Another method to use is Google’s Adwords Keyword Tool.

Retailers may consider to choose negative keywords when using AdWords. They are the words you do not want your ads appearing for. Just about any ad that retailers are preparing for would benefit from negative keywords identification.

What have keywords to do with pay-per-click advertising?

Keywords are the bait that retailers use to lure prospective customers to their websites. Customers, on the other hand, use keywords to describe what they hope to find when performing an online search. Many retailers use Google AdWords, an advertising service by Google, to display their ads on Google and its advertising network.

AdWords works on a pay-per-click basis where the retailer bids on certain keywords or phrases. The retailer starts by choosing one or more keywords, a certain advertisement, and a bid value for the keyword(s) (i.e., maximum willingness to pay for a click) while competing against other advertisers.

When a customer enters a keyword in a search box, a keyword auction begins.

How much should retailers pay for keyword(s)?

Many retailers think that if they bid the highest on a certain keyword, they will get the best results. Although these retailer’s ads will be at the top of the first result page, their budgets will quickly run dry because of the high cost –per-click.

If retailers choose to bid lower for a specific keyword, their ads may appear lower on the result pages, but they show for a longer time.

Visit eBizplan for your digital marketing queries.

How to be Successful with Pay-Per-Click Advertising

Do you pay for the clicks of your AdWords campaign without getting the sales? Here are some points to consider when planning your next pay-per-click advertising campaign.

 Pay-per-click adverts are not for free

Pay-per-click (PPC) advertising for retailers is similar than the advertising campaigns they do in the print media – they must pay for it.   The retailer needs to plan her PPC carefully otherwise the people clicking on the ad may not find what they were looking for.

Depending how expensive your keywords are, a lot of money could be wasted when the wrong audience is responding to your ads.

Here are some points to consider before starting your pay-per-click campaign:

  1. Keywords – should describe the kind of website pages where the retailer wants her ad to be displayed;
  2. Ads – the ad needs to deliver the following messages in the shortest time to read it:
    1. The retailer’s website is the best source of information that will visitor is looking for;
    2. The benefits to click on the retailer’s website is clear; and
    3. The visitors know what is expected from them once they arrive at the retailer’s website.
  3. Bid prices – the retailer will quickly find what the cost of a keyword is once her campaign has started. She should adjust bids until the ad shows the required profit;
  4. Landing page – is the page that visitors go to when clicking on a retailer’s PPC ad. The best results with a PPC ad is possible when the landing page match the theme of the keywords and ad message;
  5. Conversion path – having decided to buy, a visitor must be able to give information about the type of product, where it must be delivered and how it should be paid for. If the conversion path is not clear, the visitor may leave your website.

A PPC ad campaign is much more than selecting a couple of keywords and bet on them. A successful campaign is one that is well planned, well measured and flexible.

Visit eBizplan to help you with your digital marketing strategy.

Note

Szetela, D. and Kerschbaum, J. 2010. Pay-per-click search engine marketing: An hour a day. John Wiley & Sons.

Finding Customers in the Vastness of the Internet

No business can exists without customers. However, finding customers on the internet can be a challenge for most Bricks and Clicks retailers. Once you know who your audience is, where they hang out online and what they respond best to, you can begin to market…

The vastness of the internet

Online advertising and the retailer’s website can be exposed to thousands of people around the world for little cost due to the vastness of the internet.

The challenge is to find to the customers online.

Steps to find customers online

Dean Brookstone proposes the following steps to find customers online:

  1. Register and set up your website/blog and ensure it’s optimized for mobile devices;
  2. Help customers to find you on Google by making use of a Search Engine Optimization (SEO) strategy;
  3. Keyword research – find out what keywords or keyword phrases will attract customers to your website;
  4. Start a blog page for your retail business – writing blogs with great content will draw customers to your website;
  5. Use hyperlinks to grow your business – internal- and inbound links show Google which pages of your website are the most important. The links may also help to improve your page ranking;
  6. Introduce your retail business on the social network sites. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and Instagram are excellent platforms to find customers online;
  7. Use email campaigns to build relationships with people and to turn them into customers;
  8. Measure your progress with analytics to improve your business.

If you put all these steps together, you will find the customers that are seemingly lost in the vastness of the internet.

If you need help with your Digital Marketing campaign or Business Planning, please visit eBizplan.