Tag Archives: digital age

How the Fourth Industrial Revolution Shapes the Retail Industry

It seems to almost happen overnight, the Fourth Industrial Revolution. “Something’s coming. It’s picking up speed and will overtake most of us in the coming years. Industries will be disrupted, lifestyles will be altered, economics will be shattered as this revolution takes hold”, according to a press release by the Digital Journal.

The revolution started almost unnoticed, very quiet and extremely swiftly. It’s also clean, unlike the first industrial revolution that was noisy, dirty and very slowly – just imagine the coal gobbling steam engines, 3 centuries ago…

Don’t make any mistake. The 4th Industrial Revolution wouldn’t have happened without the 1st (coal); the 2nd (oil and electricity) and the 3rd (internet technology and clean energy) Industrial Revolutions.

However, the Fourth Industrial Revolution is busy happening right now and it’s having a profound effect on our businesses and our lives. Indeed, the Fourth Industrial Revolution and the future of core technology trend are expected to result in an all-new era of automated industries 1.

Also, the retail industry and its customers are already part and parcel of this revolution.

So what is the Fourth Industrial Revolution?

The internet and Information Communication Technology (ICT) have facilitated the advent of cyber-physical Internet-based systems.  These systems offer innovative capacities that can benefit industry and other economic sectors. This phenomenon is happening now and is known as the 4th Industrial Revolution.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is a fusion of all current technologies to create a cyber-physical system 1.

Floridi 3 (2014) explains the 4th Industrial Revolution as a space where smart and autonomous agents no longer need to be human.  Therefore, a society that’s fully dependent on third-order technologies and thus are human-independent. Here, learned machines that communicate with each other, are taking over the thinking and doing of humans…

Or, as Oosthuizen 2 (2016) recently described it: “Consider the possibilities of mobile devices connecting billions of people driving unparalleled processing power, storage capabilities and access to knowledge. In addition, the overwhelming convergence of emergent technology such as, among others, artificial intelligence (AI), robotics, the internet of things (IoT), autonomous vehicles, 3D printing, nanotechnology, biotechnology, materials science, energy storage and quantum computing.”

The retail industry is one of the spaces in business that the 4th Industrial Revolution is seen working and it is experienced by many.

How the Fourth Industrial Revolution shapes the retail industry

The World Economic Forum 4 (2015) identified six software and services mega-trends which are shaping society:

People and the internet

How people connect with others, information and the world around them is being transformed through a combination of technologies. Wearable and implantable technologies will enhance people’s “digital presence”, allowing them to interact with objects and one another in new ways.

Bricks2Clicks recently discussed how the multi-purposed smartphones of customers that are AI empowered can help them to connect, communicate, recognize and experience the digital world of the 4th Industrial revolution.

Computing, communications and storage everywhere

The continued rapid decline in the size and cost of computing and connectivity technologies is driving an exponential growth in the potential to access and leverage the internet. This will lead to ubiquitous computing power being available, where everyone has access to a supercomputer in their pocket, with nearly unlimited storage capacity.

The use of the mobile smartphone has grown exponentially since its introduction a decade ago. In fact, just over 36 percent of the world’s population is projected to use a smartphone by 2018, up from about 10 percent in 2011, according to Statista. For retailers the growth in use of smartphones by their customers may result in opportunities and threats. Read more: Bricks and Mortar Retailers Need To Be Smart With Smartphone Customers.

The Internet of Things (IOT)

Smaller, cheaper and smarter sensors are being introduced – in homes, clothes and accessories, cities, transport and energy networks, as well as manufacturing processes.

“Connected devices and products provide retailers with the opportunity to help optimize operations in the face of a more complex supply chain. That’s  increasingly important for digital channels, and a more demanding customers.  By utilizing the IOT, managers can track inventory more easily, and adjusting pricing in real time using smart tags”, says Douw G Steyn (Bricks2Clicks).

Artificial intelligence (AI) and big data

Exponential digitization creates exponentially more data – about everything and everyone. In parallel, the sophistication of the problems software can address, and the ability for software to learn and evolve itself, is advancing rapidly. This is built on the rise of big data for decision-making, and the influence that AI and robotics are starting to have on decision-making and jobs.

Retailers will have to decide where and when Artificial Intelligence has the potential to replace human intelligence. Cost and scale will drive these decisions. Future decisions about AI by retailers will probably be about the ethics of using the technology and the effect it may have on society. Further reading: Artificial Intelligence – Digital Outcomes or Digital Disruptions for Retailers?

The sharing economy and distributed trust

The internet is driving a shift towards networks and platform-based social and economic models. As a result, assets can be shared, creating not just new efficiencies but also whole new business models and opportunities for social self-organization. The Blockchain, an emerging technology, replaces the need for third-party institutions to provide trust for financial, contract and voting activities.

Here we are talking about crypto-currencies such as Bitcoin. “There is the potential for a lot of demand for crypto-currencies from a consumer perspective. But right now it’s a pretty complex process to set up a digital wallet, gain access to a crypto-currency exchange, and start buying up coins”, according to Nikki Baird (Forbes).

The digitization of matter

Physical objects are “printed” from raw materials via additive, or 3D, printing, a process that transforms industrial manufacturing. Consequently it allows for printing products at home and creates a whole set of human health opportunities.

3D printing technology for retailers is now emerging as an outcome for small localized retailers that are facing closure. However, as it is with most disruptive technologies, the advantages that 3D printing offer for retailers should be weighed against its potential pitfalls. Read more: 3D Printing Technology for Retailers – An Opportunity or a Waste of Money?

Conclusion

The 4th Industrial Revolution is not only about digital technology and gadgets, but also about us. How should we prepare ourselves and our children to survive and prosper in this digital, robotic and information rich space? And what about retail? Not only need the structure, operations and organisational cultures change at retailers, but retailers also need extraordinary leaders (Read: Success in the Digital Age Requires Extraordinary Retail Leaders).

The last words are from Albert Einstein: “The distinction between the past, present and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion.”

Notes

1 Chung, M. and Kim, J. 2016. The Internet Information and Technology Research Directions based on the Fourth Industrial Revolution, KSII Transactions on Internet & Information Systems, 10(3):1311-1320.

2 Oosthuizen, J.H. 2016. Entrepreneurial intelligence: expanding Schwab’s four-type intelligence proposition to meaningfully address the challenges of the fourth industrial revolution. In proceedings of 28th Annual Conference of the Southern African Institute of Management Scientists, University of Pretoria, South Africa.

3 Luciano Floridi 2014. The Fourth Revolution, How the Infosphere is Reshaping Human Reality, Oxford University Press, USA.

4 World Economic Forum 2015. Deep Shift: Technology Tipping Points and Societal Impact, Global Agenda Council on the Future of Software & Society, Survey Report, World Economic Forum, Geneva, Switzerland.

Images

c1.staticflickr.com and pixabay.com

Demise of Loyal Retail Customers in the Digital Age

Loyal retail customers have for long now given Bricks and Mortar (BM) retailers an advantage over their competitors. However, the advent of the internet and the subsequent development of the online shopping channel have changed the shopping behaviour of retail customers.

Although BM retailers have invested millions of dollars in customer loyalty programs, the convenience, speed and assortment of products customers enjoy online lured many loyal customers away. This is apparent with the closedown of thousands of retail stores, and the vanishing of well-known retail brands over the last couple of years.

The big challenge for BM retailers is to the get customers back to their stores. Thereafter, the retailers should have a strategy in place to keep them coming back. In other words, making their customers loyal again…

What are loyal retail customers?

Customer loyalty is according to PR Loyalty Marketing both an attitudinal and behavioral tendency to favor one brand over all others. This may be due to satisfaction with the product or service, its convenience or performance, or simply familiarity and comfort with the brand.

Loyalty is formed in four stages 1 – cognitive, affective, conative, and action.

  1. Cognitive loyalty – in the first loyalty stage, consumers develop value expectations and preference for one brand relative to other available alternatives.
  2. Affective loyalty – here the consumers begins to develop a liking or attitude towards the brand based on an increasingly satisfying experience with the brand.
  3. Connotative loyalty – the third stage, which is confined to consumer’s behavioral intention. The consumer has deeply held commitment to buy the brand.
  4. Action loyalty – is where the desire and intention in the previous loyalty state has translated into realistic loyalty actions or behaviour.

It takes time, money and commitment from retailers to get loyal retail customers. This process, mostly took place at the BM retailer’s store in the local shopping center. However, retail customers in the digital age can shop anywhere, at any time, at the best price.

So, BM retailers need to rethink their customer loyalty programs. They need to find out what “delights” their customers. How has the internet and the online retail channel affected their shopping behaviour in the retail stores?

Loyal retail customers in multi-channel retail

Retailers can nowadays rely only on more than one channel to do business with. As a result, most BM retailers adopted eCommerce to become Bricks and Clicks retailers. Online retailers, on the other hand, started to open physical stores to serve as showrooms for their products. Indeed, loyal retail customers need to be found outside the traditional retail channels.

“In the digital age, your customers have apps that let them search for products, compare products, review products, check prices, compare prices, and even buy the product without ever stepping foot in your store “says Tiffany Marshall. So what must retailers do to get their loyal retail customers back?

Media Genesis suggests that retailers do the following to get back loyal retail customers:

  • Build an emotional connection – whether it’s through exclusive content or rewards, making your consumer feel special is an important part of brand loyalty.
  • Personalize – you have your customer’s data; use it to your advantage! Make your content relevant and engaging by making sure that it is (almost) custom-made for your consumer.
  • Use your data – use data, analytics, and your digital business capabilities to go beyond just rewards. Use the information you’ve gathered to really analyse how your consumers want to engage with your brand and build a strategy to do it.
  • Create an active online presence – forgoing a good website and a strong online presence is essentially a death sentence in today’s digital marketplace. Most consumers prefer to shop online and not having an easy to use website is like excluding your brand from the conversation. It’s not enough to just post on social media. Create conversations, respond to customers, and help make customer service a 360° experience.
  • Merge your worlds – make the online to offline experience completely complimentary by identifying all of the crucial touch points you may have with your consumers. You might even see a return in foot traffic if the consumer consistently sees your brand attached to good prices online. When they need something in a pinch, your brand will be at the top of their mind.
  • Make it easy – as a business, you now have to prioritize delivering quality, enjoyable interactions with your consumers. This is the best way to build a lasting customer relationship in the digital age. If your web presence does some of the heavy lifting for your consumer, making it easier for them to reach their end goal, the quality of the experience will resonate and they’ll be back for more.

Concluding

Online shopping caters to the busy lifestyle of modern people, and its prevalence manifests the rise of the stay-at-home economy 2. Also, the internet, big data, the internet of things and social media has revolutionized the way customers interact with their retailers. I wonder, however, how loyal retail customers can be towards a chatbot?

Lastly, has the demise of the loyal retail customer started?

Read also: Personalization of Marketing Communication – not just for your Customer’s sake

Have look at this video: “The role of customer loyalty in the small business”

Notes

1 Kursunluoglu, E. 2014. Shopping centre customer service: creating customer satisfaction and loyalty, Marketing Intelligence & Planning, 32(4):528-548.

2 Wu, M.Y. and Tseng, L.H. 2015. Customer satisfaction and loyalty in an online shop: an experiential marketing perspective, International Journal of Business and Management, 10(1):104.

Image and video

Flickr.comlynda.com

Success in the Digital Age Requires Extraordinary Retail Leaders

The carnage intensified last year. “There were 15 shop closures a day across the UK in the first half of 2016 and the number of new openings has fallen to the lowest level for five years” writes Graham Ruddick, senior business reporter at The Guardian. And the carnage is continuing this year. “Brick and mortar stores are suffering due to competition from online sales and the closures just keep coming” according to Daniel Kline in MotleyFool. What is happening? Where are the retail leaders?

The advent of eCommerce, mobile shopping, interactive social media and marketing automation caused a ‘digital disruption’ in the retail industry. However, many established retail brands failed to adapt to the fast changing behaviors and high demands of their consumers. The digital age has come for them and moved on. As a result, retail leaders that couldn’t cope with the disruption have capitulated. But what type of retail leaders does the sector need during these turbulent times?

Retail leaders in the digital age

Leadership is a process whereby an individual influences a group of individuals to achieve a common goal 1. But how can retailers lead and influence their staff during this digital disruption? Maybe it’s time to challenge retail leadership says Ken Silay, Partner, Innovator’s Equation. Ken suggests writing for Innovative Retail Technologies that “The truth is retail is run by old thinking and old metrics” and “difference between the old and new thinking in business creates a gap in retail leadership that will continue to get wider”.

Dr Ganesh Shermon, Managing Partner for “R for C Talent Management Solutions” (North America) recently highlighted the challenges retailers face. He said that retailers are confronted with dramatic managerial changes, given the convergence of the human mind, (Intellect), behavioral psychology (Cognitive), smart machines, and deep learning science and knowledge (Neural networks) as the basis for management actions. That’s really a mouth full!

The truth is that the old way of leading a retail business does not work anymore. But what should retailers do to get their businesses on par with the digital age?

Strategies that leaders should consider in the Digital Age

Prof Kamal Kishor Jain, Head of HR and Business Psychology Department at IIM Indore, recently said digital age leaders need to acknowledge the limits of their expertise. Additionally, the leaders should build a reliable network of knowledgeable experts to help them navigate through their choices. Prof Jain suggests the following:

  • Speed – is the most distinguishing characteristic of the digital age. No matter how fast you are moving to transform your business; the depressing reality is that you still probably aren’t moving fast enough.
  • Knowledge creation – we need to become more right brained to compete and survive. Leadership is not a noun, it’s a verb. The real charismatic leader is one who disseminates knowledge into his subordinates.
  • Primarily leadership qualities – leaders should be daring, caring and sharing. ‘Failing fast’ and ‘falling forward’ are critical precursors to success in the digital era. Such disruptive change requires leaders to be caring about people are affected by such changes. It is only by caring that a leader can elicit support from followers.

The Global Center for Digital Business Transformation, an initiative of IMD business school and Cisco, and HR consultancy metaBeratung, have identified four competencies (HAVE) that business leaders need in order to excel in the era of digital disruption:

  • Humble – in an age of rapid change, knowing what you don’t know can be as valuable in a business context as knowing what you do. Therefore, digital leaders need a measure of humility, and a willingness to seek diverse inputs both from within and outside their organisations.
  • Adaptable – in a complex and changing environment, an ability to adapt is critical. The global reach of digital technologies has opened up new frontiers for organizations, shrinking once insurmountable continental divides and erasing traditional boundaries between territories. Dealing with the cultural and business impacts of this requires adaptability.
  • Visionary – in times of profound disruption, clear-eyed and rational direction finding is needed. Therefore a clear vision, even in the absence of detailed plans, is a core competency for digital leaders.
  • Engaged – painting visions for the future, successfully communicating these visions and being adaptable enough to change them, requires constant engagement with stakeholders. This broad-based desire to explore, discover, learn and discuss with others is as much a mind-set, as it is a definable set of business-focused activities or behaviors.

How can leaders change their retail business to digital?

It is impossible for retailers to change overnight from doing their things the old way to embracing the digital economy. Indeed, the process must get started and in quick time. Therefore, the ability to digitally re-imagine the business is determined in large part by a clear digital strategy supported by leaders who foster a culture able to change and invent the new 3.  Kane et al proposed the following strategies for retailers to use getting their business to the digital age:

  1. Create a strategy that transforms – when developing a more advanced digital strategy; the best approach may be to turn the traditional strategy development process on its head.
  2. Get the right people for job – just as important as developing talent is reducing the risk of losing it.
  3. Take risks – to boost risk taking in their companies, executives need to change their mind-sets.
  4. Sparking new ideas – many new ideas arise through collaborative efforts among people of different backgrounds.
  5. Telling the story – storytelling is becoming a popular means of gaining employee buy-in and organizational traction for digital transformation.

After all, it will probably require an extraordinary retail leaders to facilitate the move of their businesses from analogue to digital.

Watch this video: “A successful leader must be a global leader, says Marshall Goldsmith.”

Concluding

“If something isn’t working within your organization, challenge it. And if your leadership steps on your challenge, find someone to work for who isn’t afraid of a challenge. An organization that doesn’t try to define their future isn’t moving forward anyway” advises Ken Silay. Therefore, if you are one of the retail leaders raising your hand to lead your company into the digital age, make sure that you have the right qualities.

Read also:

Crossing the digital threshold – adding Clicks to Bricks for sustainable retail outcomes

Notes

1 Saint, S., Kowalski, C.P., Banaszak-Holl, J., Forman, J., Damschroder, L. and Krein, S.L. 2010. The importance of leadership in preventing healthcare-associated infection: results of a multisite qualitative study, Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, 31(09):901-907.

2 Shermon, G, 2017. Bringing disruptions into the workplace, Human Capital, p44. March, 2017.

3 Kane, G.C., Palmer, D., Phillips, A.N., Kiron, D. and Buckley, N., 2015. Strategy, not technology, drives digital transformation. MIT Sloan Management Review and Deloitte University Press, 14.

Image and video

wikimedia.org; Big Think

 

Generation Y, Showing the Way for Retailers in the Digital Age

Generation Y or Millenniums, comprises of individuals that were born between 1980 and 1994, and make up about 25% of the world’s population. Gen Y is therefore an important cohort for retailers to target because of its size and purchasing power. Retailers, as with the other generational cohorts (Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Z), need to know what the shopping behaviors of the Gen Yers are. But first we need to know who Generation Y is?

Who is Generation Y?

Generation Y individuals came of age during a period of economic growth, a strong emergence of social media and reality television, and the disappearance of modernist values, supported by internationalization and strong influences from popular culture 1. They are perceived as more focused on living large and carefree compared to more serious previous generations.

Some describes the Millenniums as most diverse; underemployed; lazy; entitled; self-centered spoiled brats. However, most of them feel frustration, fear, doubt and even anxiety taking their first steps “in the real world”. Since they are most of the time connected to the internet, Generation Y hears the ‘bad’ news about inflation, unemployment; changes in public policies in real time. Digital communication technology is part of Gen Y’s existence.

The Millenniums have grown up with technology and it has captured their lives. Hussein 2 (2016) stated that 87% of Generation Y always had their smartphones at their side, day and night. Further, he said, 78% of them spend over 2 hours a day using their smartphones, and 68% considers their smartphone to be a personal device.

“Gen Yers are multi-taskers who use their mobile phones for just about anything: social networking, to find a job, and to get grassroots-generated information about products, services, schools, employers and travel destinations” suggests Parment 1 (2013).

Also, Generation Y actively contributes, shares, searches for and consumes content – plus works and plays – on social media platforms 3.  The table below, published by the American Press Institute, indicates how and when Gen Yers use different social media network sites.

How Millennials use different social media network sites

Used daily Used occasionally
Facebook 57 31
YouTube 29 54
Instagram 26 23
Twitter 13 21
Pinterest 10 25
Reddit 8 15
Tumblr 7 14

 

Fifty seven percent of Millenniums indicated that they use Facebook daily, while 54% used YouTube occasionally. How can retailers engage with this tech savvy and connected cohort?

The shopping behaviour of Generation Y

Retailers that understand the shopping behaviour of their customers may enjoy an advantage over their competitors. Generation Y are generally not loyal customers. Therefore retailers should provide them superior customer value or any other advantage, such as a lower price 1. Gen Yers are very flexible in terms of buying expensive and cheap products – to define themselves.

Gen Y buyers select and consume products that helps to define them. The products must show what is important to them and what they value in life. They will choose products that express some aspect of their own personality or image. Hence the Millenniums visit numerous shops regularly, in effort to stay in tune with what is ‘in’ at the moment. As a result they often visit clothing stores without having a pronounced need.

The Millennials – the largest generation in US history – are entering their peak spending years. Lindsay Drucker Mann, a vice president in Global Investment Research at Goldman Sachs, explains how companies are responding to their growing economic influence:


However, the Y Generation is  the cohort that does most of their shopping online.

Online shopping behavior of Generation Y

The association that Gen Y has with digital communication technology makes the internet an obvious channel for retailers to interact with them. However, cautions Parment 1 (2013), Generation Y wants to decide when, where and how companies communicate with them. They take the opinion of others into account when making a buying decision.

Retailers should note that Generation Y freely discusses various issues with their friends on social media platforms like Facebook. Gen Y considers friends to be credible sources that have a big influence of how this cohort evaluates products and brands4.

Jaz Frederick, writing in PFSWeb.com highlighted some trends among Millennials and online shopping:

  • the average consumer aged 18 to 34 invests $2,000 per year on digital retail sites;
  • millennials show the highest growth (32%) in mobile sales;
  • smartphones are the most-used shopping device for the Y Generation.

Retailers need to be found online and make sure that Millennials have great experience when visiting their pages.

Concluding

The Generation Y is a complex cohort. Nevertheless, they are the generation who must lead humanity into the digital age. The Millennials will dictate to retailers what technology to use and what content they want. Ultimately, Gen Y is paving the way for all of us to face the realities of the digital age. Please have patience with them…

Read also:

  1. Selling to the Young Ones, Generation Z
  2. Know Your Clever, Less Distinctive Customers – Generation X
  3. Shopping Behavior of The Baby Boomers
  4. Demographic Segmentation – Dividing the Market by Generations

Notes:

1 Parment, A. 2013. Generation Y vs. Baby Boomers: Shopping behavior, buyer involvement and implications for retailing. Journal of retailing and consumer services, 20(2):189-199.

2 Hussein, Z. 2016. Assessing the purchase intention of Malaysian Generation Y in mobile shopping. IJASOS-International E-journal of Advances in Social Sciences, 2(5):424-431.

3 Bolton, R.N., Parasuraman, A., Hoefnagels, A., Migchels, N., Kabadayi, S., Gruber, T., Komarova Loureiro, Y. and Solnet, D. 2013. Understanding Generation Y and their use of social media: a review and research agenda. Journal of Service Management, 24(3):245-267.

4 Viswanathan, V. and Jain, V. 2013. A dual-system approach to understanding “generation Y” decision making. Journal of consumer marketing, 30(6):484-492.

Image:

Pixabay.com