Tag Archives: digital integration

Success in the Digital Age Requires Extraordinary Retail Leaders

The carnage intensified last year. “There were 15 shop closures a day across the UK in the first half of 2016 and the number of new openings has fallen to the lowest level for five years” writes Graham Ruddick, senior business reporter at The Guardian. And the carnage is continuing this year. “Brick and mortar stores are suffering due to competition from online sales and the closures just keep coming” according to Daniel Kline in MotleyFool. What is happening? Where are the retail leaders?

The advent of eCommerce, mobile shopping, interactive social media and marketing automation caused a ‘digital disruption’ in the retail industry. However, many established retail brands failed to adapt to the fast changing behaviors and high demands of their consumers. The digital age has come for them and moved on. As a result, retail leaders that couldn’t cope with the disruption have capitulated. But what type of retail leaders does the sector need during these turbulent times?

Retail leaders in the digital age

Leadership is a process whereby an individual influences a group of individuals to achieve a common goal 1. But how can retailers lead and influence their staff during this digital disruption? Maybe it’s time to challenge retail leadership says Ken Silay, Partner, Innovator’s Equation. Ken suggests writing for Innovative Retail Technologies that “The truth is retail is run by old thinking and old metrics” and “difference between the old and new thinking in business creates a gap in retail leadership that will continue to get wider”.

Dr Ganesh Shermon, Managing Partner for “R for C Talent Management Solutions” (North America) recently highlighted the challenges retailers face. He said that retailers are confronted with dramatic managerial changes, given the convergence of the human mind, (Intellect), behavioral psychology (Cognitive), smart machines, and deep learning science and knowledge (Neural networks) as the basis for management actions. That’s really a mouth full!

The truth is that the old way of leading a retail business does not work anymore. But what should retailers do to get their businesses on par with the digital age?

Strategies that leaders should consider in the Digital Age

Prof Kamal Kishor Jain, Head of HR and Business Psychology Department at IIM Indore, recently said digital age leaders need to acknowledge the limits of their expertise. Additionally, the leaders should build a reliable network of knowledgeable experts to help them navigate through their choices. Prof Jain suggests the following:

  • Speed – is the most distinguishing characteristic of the digital age. No matter how fast you are moving to transform your business; the depressing reality is that you still probably aren’t moving fast enough.
  • Knowledge creation – we need to become more right brained to compete and survive. Leadership is not a noun, it’s a verb. The real charismatic leader is one who disseminates knowledge into his subordinates.
  • Primarily leadership qualities – leaders should be daring, caring and sharing. ‘Failing fast’ and ‘falling forward’ are critical precursors to success in the digital era. Such disruptive change requires leaders to be caring about people are affected by such changes. It is only by caring that a leader can elicit support from followers.

The Global Center for Digital Business Transformation, an initiative of IMD business school and Cisco, and HR consultancy metaBeratung, have identified four competencies (HAVE) that business leaders need in order to excel in the era of digital disruption:

  • Humble – in an age of rapid change, knowing what you don’t know can be as valuable in a business context as knowing what you do. Therefore, digital leaders need a measure of humility, and a willingness to seek diverse inputs both from within and outside their organisations.
  • Adaptable – in a complex and changing environment, an ability to adapt is critical. The global reach of digital technologies has opened up new frontiers for organizations, shrinking once insurmountable continental divides and erasing traditional boundaries between territories. Dealing with the cultural and business impacts of this requires adaptability.
  • Visionary – in times of profound disruption, clear-eyed and rational direction finding is needed. Therefore a clear vision, even in the absence of detailed plans, is a core competency for digital leaders.
  • Engaged – painting visions for the future, successfully communicating these visions and being adaptable enough to change them, requires constant engagement with stakeholders. This broad-based desire to explore, discover, learn and discuss with others is as much a mind-set, as it is a definable set of business-focused activities or behaviors.

How can leaders change their retail business to digital?

It is impossible for retailers to change overnight from doing their things the old way to embracing the digital economy. Indeed, the process must get started and in quick time. Therefore, the ability to digitally re-imagine the business is determined in large part by a clear digital strategy supported by leaders who foster a culture able to change and invent the new 3.  Kane et al proposed the following strategies for retailers to use getting their business to the digital age:

  1. Create a strategy that transforms – when developing a more advanced digital strategy; the best approach may be to turn the traditional strategy development process on its head.
  2. Get the right people for job – just as important as developing talent is reducing the risk of losing it.
  3. Take risks – to boost risk taking in their companies, executives need to change their mind-sets.
  4. Sparking new ideas – many new ideas arise through collaborative efforts among people of different backgrounds.
  5. Telling the story – storytelling is becoming a popular means of gaining employee buy-in and organizational traction for digital transformation.

After all, it will probably require an extraordinary retail leaders to facilitate the move of their businesses from analogue to digital.

Watch this video: “A successful leader must be a global leader, says Marshall Goldsmith.”

Concluding

“If something isn’t working within your organization, challenge it. And if your leadership steps on your challenge, find someone to work for who isn’t afraid of a challenge. An organization that doesn’t try to define their future isn’t moving forward anyway” advises Ken Silay. Therefore, if you are one of the retail leaders raising your hand to lead your company into the digital age, make sure that you have the right qualities.

Read also:

Crossing the digital threshold – adding Clicks to Bricks for sustainable retail outcomes

Notes

1 Saint, S., Kowalski, C.P., Banaszak-Holl, J., Forman, J., Damschroder, L. and Krein, S.L. 2010. The importance of leadership in preventing healthcare-associated infection: results of a multisite qualitative study, Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, 31(09):901-907.

2 Shermon, G, 2017. Bringing disruptions into the workplace, Human Capital, p44. March, 2017.

3 Kane, G.C., Palmer, D., Phillips, A.N., Kiron, D. and Buckley, N., 2015. Strategy, not technology, drives digital transformation. MIT Sloan Management Review and Deloitte University Press, 14.

Image and video

wikimedia.org; Big Think

 

How successful are Retailers in the Omnichannel?

Bricks and Clicks (B&C) retailing is with us for more than two decades. The adding of the online channel to their physical business has allowed retailers to survive and grow even during tough trading conditions.  However, a recent report by Andria Cheng in eMarketer suggests that B&C retailers are struggling to the get their omnichannel strategies to work.

Andria refers to a 2016 survey of about 350 retail and consumer goods CEOs in countries such as the US and China. The survey was conducted by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) for JDA, a supply chain software provider for retailers from Ann Taylor parent company Ann Inc. to grocer Albertsons. Several worrying aspects about the use of the omnichannel in the retail industry came to the fore with this survey.

How effective are Bricks and Clicks retailers using the omnichannel?

The reasons for retailers to become Bricks and Clicks were discussed previously by this author: “Crossing the digital threshold – adding Clicks to Bricks for sustainable retail outcomes”.  However, the implementation of an omnichannel retail strategy seems not that straightforward.

Results from the survey commissioned by PwC (reported by eMarketer) indicated the following:

  • More than half of retailers haven’t started implementing, are struggling to define or don’t even have plans to develop a “digital transformation strategy”.
  • Only 10% of CEOs say they are able to make a profit while fulfilling omnichannel demand because of delivery and other supply chain complexities.
  • 75% of retail executives said their online operating costs as a percentage of sales have seen either “significant” or “some” increase in the past 12 months. One key driver of that increase: 74% of retailers said customer returns are hurting profit to “a great extent” or “to some extent.”
  • CEOs, especially those in the soft-lines (like apparel) and hard goods (like appliances) sectors, said that their greatest concern is inventory exhaustion, or “out of stock.” Out of stock is a big problem hurting retailers’ ability to convert sales when consumers visit stores.
  • More than half (51%) of respondents said they offer or plan to offer pick up in store in the next 12 months.
  • With the high costs of free shipping and other delivery offers, 33% of survey respondents said they would offer same-day delivery in 2017, down from 44% last year. Meanwhile, a third of respondents said they plan to increase the minimum order value. The percentage of retailers offering specific delivery time slots also has declined.
  • Almost three-fifths of retailers surveyed said they have no plans to reduce their store investment and said their online sales are “additional” sales that aren’t hurting their physical store sales.
  • Automation and internet of things rank lower on their investment list for now, even though these are the areas that are gaining ground as retailers consider them “true game changers,” according to the survey.

Digital technology such as artificial intelligence (AI) and self-service technology (SST) are for long now available for retailers to use.

How to add digital technology seamlessly to your retail business

Digital communication technology is part of the retail setup and is here to stay.  However, retailers are reluctant to adopt the technology for a number of reasons. Retailers should consider the following when deciding to add digital:

  1. Visualize what your business will achieve by adding digital and how your customers will respond to it;
  2. Develop a business plan to integrate the digital with the physical operations of your business;
  3. The integration will cost you money – find out how much and where the funds will come from;
  4. Before your spend a cent on it – discuss and argue the process with all the stakeholders – allow everyone to have their say;
  5. If possible, do a quick survey with your customers to get their opinion on the matter;
  6. Once everyone has agreed with the integration, develop and implement an integration strategy;
  7. Measure the results and make corrections as the process moves forward;
  8. If you lose money continuously, start again or discard the process.

Most of the reactions of the CEOs coming from the PwC survey can probably be because they didn’t plan properly. To be honest, failing to plan is planning to fail.

A strategic planning session

Concluding

The digitization of retail is as revolutionary as it gets. Not only that, it is disruptive. Integrating the digital with the physical is no more ‘a nice to have’. Retailers ignoring the revolution facilitated by digital communication technology, and driven by their customers 1, will fail. Strategic planning may help retailers to do the integration orderly and seamlessly. Only then retailers can enjoy success in the omni retail channel.

Note:

1 Picot-Coupey, K., Huré, E. and Piveteau, L. 2016. Channel design to enrich customers’ shopping experiences: Synchronizing clicks with bricks in an omni-channel perspective–the Direct Optic case. International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, 44(3):336-368.

Further reading

  1. How do Customers Respond to Self-Service Technology in Retail Shops?
  2. Artificial Intelligence – Digital Outcomes or Digital Disruptions for Retailers?
  3. Retail and the Internet of Things

Images:

  1. Flickr.com
  2. Wikimedia