Tag Archives: shopping behavior

Hi, I’m your Emotional Customer. Can you please help me?

There’s an emotional customer in all of us. In fact, emotional experience connotes the whole range of our feelings, including anxiety, fear, apathy, euphoria, depression, sadness, anger, and grief 1. I’m sure we’ve all experienced some of these feelings as a result of our emotional state.

Our emotional state is important because it affects our decisions before and while we’re shopping 2. And all retailers need to know it…

Now, picture yourself as an emotional customer. So, one morning you wake up, and, getting out from the wrong side of the bed, and you feel miserable. But wait, maybe it’s the perfect day to go shopping, I’m sure I’ll feel better…

You’ve made an emotional decision because – hey you’re only human…

The shopping behavior of an emotional customer

Of all the behaviors we possess, the decision to go shopping is one of our most purposeful 3. Apart from buying the products that we need, we also shop to experience entertainment, recreation, social interaction, or intellectual stimulation.

Although purposeful shopping suggests that we should do thinking and planning before purchasing, that’s not always the case. Most of us still relies on our “gut feeling” when we decide to go shopping.

So, in spite of us being so clever and having all the info, technology and tools, we mostly cope with our lives by making emotional decisions. “Decisions cannot be made solely based on logic as they may have pros and cons on both sides and simply may be too complex”, suggests Kane Simms in Guided Selling.

Now retailers need to depend on their customer’s “gut feeling” to make their shopping experience a memorable one…

Selling to an emotional customer

Every customer that walks into your store is in a specific state of mind. Indeed, Robert Taibbi in Psychology Today lists the six most common states of mind as follows:

  1. Rational. This is the gold standard, the middle of the road, the prefrontal lobes fully engaged; where you use emotions as information.
  2.  Anxious. We all know this one. It’s about the future, the what-ifs, disasters and butterflies in the stomach.
  3. Depressed. If anxiety is about the future, depression is often about the past – mistakes, regrets, roads not taken.
  4. Angry. We plot revenge, we say over and over how unfair this is, in place of anxiety’s butterflies this is a raging volcano.
  5.  Fear. Anxiety is worry; everyday fear (not battle-zone fear, surgery fear) is often tied to easily-activated little-kid fears. It’s here where you feel intimidated by someone even though in your rational mind you realize there’s no sane reason to.
  6. Rebellious. Like fear, there’s usually a little-kid element to this as well. There’s resentment and a bit of passive-aggressiveness or simple digging in of heels.

How do retailers cater for the states of mind of an emotional customer?

To create a store atmosphere conducive to buying, a retailer should establish in the consumer a frame of mind that promotes a buying spirit.

A fix retail setting may be perceived differently by every individual customer entering the store. It has mostly to do with the store’s psychological environment. In essence, a store’s psychological environment is the mental image of the store produced in the customer’s mind 4.  Also, our emotional reactions can be guided by sensory information.

Here’s how a retailer can use sensory appeals to affect a favorable store image and a pleasant shopping environment for an emotional customer 4

  • Sight Appeal. The sense of sight provides people with more information than any other sensory mode. For example: Lighting is used to highlight merchandise, sculpt space and capture a mood or feeling that enhances the store’s image.
  • Sound Appeal. Sound can either enhance or hinder a store’s buying atmosphere. For example: music in supermarkets affects the average time spent in the store.
  • Touch Appeal. For most products, personal inspection (handling, squeezing, and cuddling) is a prerequisite to buying. Before buying a product, the average consumer must at least hold it, even if it cannot be removed from its package. The chances of a sale increase substantially when the consumer handles the product.
  • Taste Appeal. For some food retailers, offering the consumer taste appeal might be a necessary condition for buying. This is often the case with specialty foods such as meats, cheeses, and bakery and dairy products.
  • Smell appeal. Smell has the greatest impact on our emotions and retailers add fragrances to enthuse a certain mood in shoppers. For example, some retailers are using a chocolate scent at the entrance of their stores in an attempt to entice customers to enter the stores.

However, for retailers to use sensory appeals to influence the mindsets of their customers there need to be customers in their stores. Physical retail stores are losing most of their customers to the online channel.

How does the online retail channel appeals to an emotional customer?

Just as with the retailer owning a physical shop, the online retailer wants to create a pleasant emotional online experience for her customers. Indeed, everything about your website – from the colors to the copy – should work to arouse the emotions of customers, according to Virginie Kevers in Emolytics.

The online channel doesn’t (not yet) offer a way for retailers to use sensory experiences like touching, smelling and tasting to influence the buying behaviors of their customers. However, the use of visual and audio sensory experiences can, with the help of a variety of online marketing tools, help convince customers to buy products online.

That’s not all. The internet is an ideal platform for customers that are highly involved in the purchasing process. These customers are interested in gaining more information about the product and processing product information in greater detail, presumably because they are more concerned about making the right decision 3. Therefore, an emotional customer’s need for intellectual stimulation can be taken care of by online retailers.

The online social media platforms are great for the emotional customer to announce her state of mind: : She’s rational; anxious; depressed; angry; afraid or  fed-up. Wow, here the savvy retailer may get to know his products and customers better with little effort…

Concluding

There’s no doubt that your customer’s state of mind has a huge affect on where and what she buys. Because we are all customers, I think we can easily relate to that. It’s a pity that the contribution that physical stores made in catering for the emotional needs of their customers is diminishing. That’s because of the massive closures of physical retail shops.

However, the online retail channel offers additional and more focused opportunities to satisfy the emotional needs of retail customers. And, together with that, can retailers now communicate personally with their emotional customer, online of course.

What is next? Only time will tell if retail customers will bond emotionally with robots and other AI devices. Then again…

Read also: The Joy of Shopping

Video: 8 Emotional Triggers That Get Customers To Buy


Notes

1 Goetz, C.G. ed. 2007. Textbook of clinical neurology (Vol. 355), Elsevier Health Sciences.

2 Sherman, E., Mathur, A. and Smith, R.B. 1997. Store environment and consumer purchase behavior: mediating role of consumer emotions, Psychology and Marketing, 14(4):361-378.

3 Puccinelli, N.M., Goodstein, R.C., Grewal, D., Price, R., Raghubir, P. and Stewart, D. 2009. Customer experience management in retailing: understanding the buying process, Journal of Retailing, 85(1):15-30.

4 University of South Africa 2009. Course in Retail Marketing and Merchandising, Practical Merchandising, Only study guide for CRMM02-X, Centre of Business Management, Pretoria.

Image

Wikimedia.org

Selling to the Young Ones, Generation Z

The teens and tweens of today are a cohort of kids that doesn’t have a definitive name yet, however some have dubbed it Generation Z. Generation Z, the largest demographic cohort comprises 25% of the US population (Wikipedia, 2015).  They will start working by 2020 and earning lots of money that need spending. Therefore Generation Z should be taken seriously by retailers who need to know who they are and what their needs, wants and preferences are.

The characteristics of Generation Z

Generation Z was born after 1994 and is the newest generation. The generation has grown up surrounded by technology and are known to be highly connected with each other 1. A highlight of this generation is their ‘color-blindness’, their sensitivity to diverse cultures and personal differences 2. They are willing to embrace diversity to an unprecedented degree and are globally accepting. Although the Z Generation is go-getters and trendsetters, they guard their privacy fiercely. Rayan Scott contributing in Forbes underlines four characteristics that are critical to know about Generation Z:

  1. Technology – Generation Z has never known a world without smartphones and social media. They gobble up information quickly and are ready to move on to the next thing in an eye blink.
  2. Privacy – they are less interested in sharing their lives for the public record. Anonymous social media platforms are more appealing to them than Facebook.
  3. Cultural diversity – Gen Z embraces multiculturalism as a touchstone of who they are, and this also informs their attitudes on social issues.
  4. Pragmatism – growing up in an uncertain world, and being raised by Generation X parents whose own prospects seemed stunted by less exuberant times, this generation is drawn to safety.

How will these distinct characteristics of Generation Z influence their shopping behaviour?

The shopping behaviour of Generation Z

Although most of them do not earn money, Generation Z is influencing almost all of the household purchasing decisions 3.  They are a group that is heavily influenced by friends, bloggers and social media, according to Farla Efros, president of HRC Retail Advisory. Teens are becoming to act more like adults in their everyday life and this also translates into their purchasing decisions. Tweens on the other hand are still too young to make their independent purchasing decisions. Chain Store Age reported the following findings of a recent study by HRC:

  • Gen Z shoppers like malls – 72% of Generation Z respondents (kids 10-17) and millennial parents with kids said they visit a mall or shopping center at least once a month.
  • Gift vouchers are popular – 69% of Generation Z children would rather receive a gift voucher for their birthday, further proving their desire to make their own purchase decisions.
  • Social influences are more important than celebrity endorsements – Gen Z shoppers tend not to be strongly influenced by celebrity endorsements from athletes, actors and singers. However, over 61% of their purchase decisions are most strongly influenced by friends, with 13% being influenced by bloggers.
  • Social media plays a major role in purchasing decisions – approximately 50% of Gen Z shoppers surveyed use social media while they shop. Of time spent social media, most popular is Facebook (61%), followed by YouTube (38%) and Instagram (24 %).

Concluding

A new generation cohort becoming retail customers, such as Generation Z, brings with them a unique perception of life and their norms, values and beliefs. From 2020, Generation Z will make out 40% of the economic active population in the US. Time to get ready for them is quickly running out. Importantly, retailers have about three years to prepare themselves for the ‘Age of Generation Z.’

Read also about the shopping behavior of older people ” Shopping Behavior of The Baby Boomers “. And something in general about generational cohorts “ Demographic Segmentation – Dividing the Market by Generations

Notes

1 Paakkari, A., 2016. Customer Journey of Generation Z in fashion purchases: Case: LMTD.

2 Mathur, M. and Hameed, S. 2016. A Study on Behavioural Competencies of the Z Generation, In International Conference on Management and Information Systems, 23: 24.

3 Cruz, M. 2016. Generation Z: influencers of decision-making process. The influence of WOM and Peer Interaction in the Decision-Making Process, Master’s Thesis, Católica Porto Business School.

Images:

1 Flickr.com

2 Flickr.com

Artificial Intelligence – Digital Outcomes or Digital Disruptions for Retailers?

Artificial intelligence (AI) is intelligence exhibited by machines. AI, still science fiction for most of us, is now becoming a daunting reality in the retail sector. Although we have learned machines (e.g. robots) for some time now, connecting them with the internet may accelerate digital disruption. Digital disruption occurs because unmet needs in the market and in our societies can be addressed through digital means1.

What does Artificial Intelligence means for retailers?

“Artificial intelligence is the key to the future of online retail, providing a crucial way to help shoppers find what they want” suggests Isabell Fraser business and property reporter at The Telegraph.  It is about consumers using voice commands using their smartphones to order products from retailers.

The opportunity that the Internet of Things (IOT) may offer Bricks and Mortar retailers was previously discussed in this blog (Retail and the Internet of Things). The IOT allows any machine with an on/off switch to be connected to the internet. “The IOT is very closely related to Artificial Intelligence (AI). In fact, IOT would not be very powerful without AI” commented Douglas Green in Quora. According to Mark Jaffe, CEO of Prelert, the realization of IOT depends on being able to gain the insights hidden in the vast and growing seas of data available. Since current approaches don’t scale to IOT volumes, the future realization of IOT’s promise is dependent on machine learning to find the patterns, correlations and anomalies that have the potential of enabling improvements in almost every facet of our daily lives.

Customers of retailers may therefore, in the near future, command any household appliance to function at their convenience.

Not long from now…

Imagine this, not long from now – Mary asks her washing machine (she named it Alice) with the following voice command: “Alice, add 2 kilogram washing powder to the shopping list”. Alice, an AI device, is also part of the IOT. Alice has recognized Mary’s voice command and added washing powder to Mary’s online shopping list which is instantly send to her local grocery retailer. Later the same day, a drone delivered the groceries, also the washing powder that was ordered by Alice.

Allright, we’re not there yet. Two of the most common uses of AI in retail are around visual search, offering shoppers items that are similar to a picture they like and have uploaded, and for personalized recommendations report Leslie Hook and Lindsay Whipp in The Financial Times.

AI inside the physical shop

AI also creates opportunities inside a store. Bricks and mortar retailers hope that AI could draw customers back to their physical stores. Leslie Hook and Lindsay Whipp quoted Michael Klein, head of industry strategy for Adobe Marketing Cloud saying that “merchandising needs to become entertainment”, pointing to digitally enabled experiences such as virtual makeovers or home furnishing demos.

Experts writing in The Future Of Shopping report talk about the impact the “fourth industrial revolution” – a merging of physical, digital and biological technologies – on shopping.

The report, co-authored London marketing agency Holition forecasts the following:

  • Virtual reality (VR) headsets that gauge your mood in the lighting and atmosphere of a simulated store.
  • Immersive virtual experiences involving products, such as visiting a cocoa farm to watch beans being picked and processed to make chocolate.
  • AI assistants that know your interests and tastes better than you do and can pre-empt purchases. For instance, shortly before a seaside holiday they might show you a range of swimwear.
  • Holographic fashion shows held in unusual locations.
A customer using a virtual mirror in store

A customer using a virtual mirror in store – image Wikimedia

Wow! There are seemingly unlimited opportunities for retailers, household appliance manufacturers and cloud computing companies applying AI. Or will the digital disruption that AI cause too big to handle?

The other side of Artificial Intelligence

The AI story unfortunately has an eerie side.

Jerry Kaplan2 introduced AI in his book with the following warning: “Recent advances in robotics, perception, and machine learning, propelled by accelerated improvement in computer technology, are enabling a new generation of systems that rivals or exceed human capabilities. These developments are likely to usher in a new age of unprecedented prosperity and leisure, but the transition may be protracted and brutal”. Kaplan foresees that without adjustments to economic systems and regulatory policies, there may be an extended period of social upheaval…

Kaplan’s concerns are shared by Bill Gates reports The Washington Post.   Gates said: “First the machines will do a lot of jobs for us and not be super intelligent. That should be positive if we manage it well. A few decades after that though the intelligence is strong enough to be a concern”. Stephan Hawkin, although totally dependent on AI, bluntly suggests that AI could bring an end to mankind.  Retailers, however, do need mankind to stay in business…

Retailers that choose to ignore AI may not escape from the digital disruptions it causes. Digital disruptors innovate rapidly, and then use their innovations to gain market share and scale. This happens far faster than challengers still clinging to predominantly physical business models can cope with1.

Concluding

Retailers will have to decide where and when Artificial Intelligence has the potential to replace human intelligence. Cost and scale will drive these decisions. Future decisions about AI by retailers will probably be about the ethics of using the technology and the effect it may have on society.

Notes

1Bradley, J., Loucks, J., Macaulay, J., Noronha, A. and Wade, M. 2015. Digital Vortex: How Digital Disruption Is Redefining Industries, ©Global Center for Digital Business Transformation.

2Kaplan, J. 2015. Humans need not apply: A guide to wealth and work in the age of artificial intelligence, Yale University Press.

Images: flickr.com; wikimedia.org

Videos Useful Convincing Shoppers to Buy

If a picture is worth a thousand words, what are online videos worth for retailers?

Bill Briggs recently reported in the Internet Retailer that shoppers who watch a video are 1.7 times more likely to buy something than those who don’t…

Seeing it in action is believing

Window shopping, about fifty years ago, was one of the most exciting things for me to do. So, on the rare occasions when visiting the city center with my mother, I would rush to the toy shop to see what’s on display.

I would press my face against the toy shop’s display window to be fascinated by the miniature trains going around on their circuits. By just watching the small trains in motion the sale could have been closed – however, it was fifty years ago…

Nowadays little kids can watch videos of dozens of makes and types of miniature train sets via the toy shop website, make a choice and click to buy at leisure to have it delivered on their doorsteps.

Videos are working for online retailers

According to Bill, video views on online retailer websites grow a massive 42% in 2015. The best videos are those that are relevant and demonstrating how the products work. Also, the videos that the customers rate the highest resulted in the most sales.

YouTube is after Google the most popular search engine used by online customers, with 3 billion searches a month.  Experts recommend that retailers use YouTube over social networks such as Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook and Twitter for demonstrating the products, because it is searchable.

Please visit my website www.ebizplan.co.za for assistance in creating business and marketing strategies for your online retail business.

Retail Customers use of Social Media Sites

Social media have created one of the most exciting and efficient opportunities for retailers to reach their customers. It also offer great opportunities for the owners of social media networking sites to get ‘pay per click’ income  when retailers post ads on the sites and visitors click on the ‘buy’ buttons to buy stuff.

That is why all popular social media networking sites such as Google, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and Twitter recently have added the ‘buy’ button to their sites. They did it to make online shopping easier for their users, and to make some money…

According to Anna Torres writing in the ChannelAdvisor, Twitter is backing off the easy-click purchase strategy. Maybe retail customers don’t like doing shopping on Twitter’s site?

How do retail customers use social media sites?

The customers of retailers visit specific social media sites for the following reasons:

  • Facebook – as of the first quarter of 2016, Facebook had 1.65 billion monthly active users (Statista). So retail customers use Facebook because everyone else is using it.
  • Google Plus – is an interest-based social network that is owned and operated by Google Inc. Similar to Facebook, Google Plus allows customers to add events, invite people, and then share photos and media;
  • Instagram, owned by Facebook  is a free online photo sharing and social network platform. It is a fun and quirky way for people to share their life with friends through a series of pictures.
  • Pinterest was founded by Ben Silbermann, Paul Sciarra and Evan Sharp. It is a visual bookmarking tool that helps customers to discover and save creative ideas.
  • Twitter, founded by Jack Dorsey – is a service for friends, family, and co-workers to communicate and stay connected through the exchange of quick, frequent messages. Fifty nine percent of Twitter users turn to the platform to catch up on news.

Retail customers use Twitter  differently compared to what they do with the other social media sites. By mainly reading, listening to and viewing the latest news, they seem to have less appetite for shopping, avoiding Twitter’s buy buttons…

Visit eBizplan for help in developing your online retail business.

Bricks and Clicks Retailers – the Best of Both Worlds

The way forward for retail is Bricks and Clicks. In an article earlier this year Justin Taylor head of EMEA retail trying to console Bricks and Mortar retailers said: “despite the impact of e-commerce, physical stores remain a cornerstone of consumer engagement”.

The question that remains to be answered is:  Why is online retail growing worldwide and, at the same time, Bricks and Mortar retailers that are not engaging their customers online are closing down?

Why do Bricks and Mortar retail customers shop online?

If Bricks and Mortar retailers are the cornerstone of customer engagement, then where have their customers gone to? The customers of Bricks and Mortar retailers probably left because they find online shopping to be more convenient:

  • They can shop 24/7 from anywhere;
  • They can get more information about products and services online;
  • They can go online to search for specific products and where to find them;
  • They can compare the prices of products online; and
  • They can share their experience online with friends, family and social communities.

In spite of the fast growth of online shopping, many retailers that are doing their business only online (Pure Clicks) are now starting to look for physical retail space.

Why are Pure Clicks retailers looking for Bricks and Mortar retail space?

It is not a simple matter of Bricks versus Clicks says Justin Taylor. Physical stores remain a hugely important part of the retailing mix as they offer the ability to interact with merchandise, instant gratification for consumers, personal service and professional guidance.

We have seen the migration from bricks to clicks, and the pattern in some instances is now heading the other way as brands born online are now seeking physical space. The answer is Bricks and Clicks retail shops that have both physical and online space. Bricks and Clicks retailers have the best of both worlds.

Integrating the physical with the online may pose a challenge for most retailers. eBizplan, a management consulting business can help retailers to run the physical and online business as one.

Retailers Biggest Challenge – Integrating Online with Offline

Retailers who are for years in business are using technology that is developed for running a physical shop (Bricks and Mortar) better and making shopping for their customers easier.  A study by Forrester Consulting found that although 90% of the UK retailers are now doing business online. However, most of them find it difficult to join their online and offline technology.

Only 26% of the retailers interviewed mentioned that their sales are influenced by the online channel.

Technology use by the customers of Bricks and Mortar retailers

Most of the customers of Bricks and Mortar retailers visit their website to get information about the inventory in the shop.  A recent study by Forrester Consulting,  found that 39% of customers are unlikely or very unlikely to visit a  store if its website does not provide physical store inventory information.

Only 32% of the shop owners that was interviewed offered a function on their websites for customers to view their in-store inventory details.

Customers want shopping convenience

The study indicated that half of all customers cited store pickup options as important or very important to them when shopping online. However, only a third of retailers today already support store-pickup programs.

Read also:  Will “Click and Collect” Solve the Delivery Headaches for Grocers?

The customers interviewed demanded the following:

  • Absolute guarantees that the product is actually available;
  • Rapid picking and notification alerts;
  • Customers want to pay at the point of pickup;
  • Customers want the option to pick their goods up at alternative locations.

In-store experience in the digital age

The customers are in power when they use their smartphones in the shop. They use their smartphones to check inventory availability before entering the store.  The customers also use their smartphones to get more information about the products  they are interested to buy.

Bricks and Clicks retailers need to be both masters of the store and of the digital domain.

eBizplan, an online consulting business, can help retailers to draft a strategic plan to integrate their offline and online business.

Five more Trends that Bricks and Clicks Retailers Should Take Note of in 2016

Software AG identified ten disruptive trends retailers should take note of this coming year. The first five trends was discussed previously. Here is the last five trends to watch out for:

6. The internet of total satisfaction

The Internet of Things (IoT) is going to revolutionize the store of the future, with its sensor-oriented devices enabling the most detailed and targeted customer centricity. Retailers embracing IoT will have visibility into inventories via electronic shelf sensors; the ability to create smart signs that are weather- or facial expression-relevant; and the tools to make every loyalty customer feel coddled and important.

7. Immersion therapy

Futuristic technology will immerse customers in the shopping experience. Technologies such as Microsoft’s Hololens will allow customers to augment reality while in-store. They will be able to try on clothes, or design their ideal kitchen, virtually, while sharing their experiences with friends and family. iBeacons™ and anonymous analytical face detection will enable retailers to interact in real time with customers, as well as track their behavior.

8. Clean-up on aisle one

Real-time monitoring capability will be critical for the store of the future, in order to sense, correlate and automate processes from staffing to inventory. Smart sensors will detect activity and provide visibility across a store coupled with streaming data and real-time analytics, allowing for actionable and automated responses to things like a spill in a grocery store or a run on umbrellas in a rainstorm.

9. Buy me now!

Retailers will further customize and personalize instant gratification “buy buttons”, which can be found anywhere from Twitter to Amazon, with the expectation that these will translate into higher earnings. But they will need to make strategic technology investments to ensure real-time inventory is understood and the complex processes involved in new channels are orchestrated correctly.

10. Last Item in Stock

Real-time inventory visibility will dominate as retailers strive to keep the customers informed of stocks at all times. Retailers will control inventories by applying technology that shows inventory levels across all channels.

A Brick and Mortar retailer battles to survive on its own, as is a Pure Click retailer… Retailers need to integrate both the physical and digital systems to prosper and grow during 2016. Visit eBizplan for plans to integrate your physical retail shop with an online retail channel.

Trends that Bricks and Clicks Retailers Should Take Note of in 2016

Software AG identified ten disruptive trends that Bricks and Clicks retailers should take note of this coming year. Here is the first five trends to watch out for:

Trends that Bricks and Clicks retailers should take note of

1. Fewer stores, more stuff

Bricks and Mortar retailers will add fewer new shops as they dramatically reinvent themselves to address multi-channel issues. To be honest, I’ve read ever more about retailers closing shops never mind not adding new ones! The Bricks and Mortar retailers that are remaining will serve more as pick up and fulfillment centers. The “endless aisle” concept will extend shelf space to the brand’s full catalog of products and accessible content.

2. Focusing on the individual customer – you

Customer-centric personalization will differentiate retailers by making their CRM strategies more targeted. Retailers may deploy customer-centric technologies such as easy sign-up, and RFID-tagged loyalty cards, which can send personalized rewards over mobile phones when in-store. The technology allows retailers to tap into internal information, known preferences, and social media data to better understand and delight their customers.

3. The right price

Differentiation by price will be much more dynamic in nature in order to beat the competition as customers become more aware and more sensitive to price.  Also, real-time electronic shelf pricing will replicate customers’ online experiences, as well as optimize inventories and reduce labor costs. Real-time personalized discounts and special offers will further motivate shoppers to head to stores.

4. A master system to control cross channel activities

Today’s customers expect to get what they want—where and when and how they want it—and they achieve it by using multiple (Omni) channels for retail and marketing communication. Therefore the complexity of omni-channel processes and how these interact with multiple systems may require a kind of “mission control” center where retailers can see and control every activity across all channels.

5. Predicting your customer’s buying behavior

Predictive analytics in retail will enable stores to know, with a great deal of certainty, what customers are going to want and when. Predictive analytics tools, especially when combined with streaming analytics, offer retailers the ability to manage queues, customer expectations and inventories before there is an issue.

Finally, Bricks and Mortar retailers are battling to survive on their own.  Retailers therefore need to integrate both the physical and digital systems to prosper and grow during 2016. The next five trends that Bricks and Clicks retailers  should take note of will be discussed in a follow-up article.

Visit eBizplan for plans to integrate your physical retail shop with an online retail channel.

Why Retailers Need to Blog

A blog page is a cost effective platform that retailers can use to interact with their customers. As a result, customers are increasingly making their final decision to buy a product by reading reviews. Also, they interact with other on the blog-page to help them with their purchase decision.

Why should a retailer have a blog?

A short answer for the above question is that it is is the space where a retailer’s customers and prospects are.  Further reasons are:

  • It offers the opportunity for retailers to communicate and interact with a large number of people at a relatively low cost.
  • Customers search the web for information about products, and what other people comment about them, also if people endorse or object products. Moreover, retailers who are blogging, can communicate  first-hand information about products to their customers.
  • The comments and reviews customers post may help retailers to identify what their customers need and where retailers can improve their business.
  • Retailers can use their blogging websites for public relations purposes. It is a useful platform for a retailer to talk to its customers and to get feedback from them.

If a retailer’s blog-page is not kept up to date, her customers may look elsewhere to find what they want.  For this reason you need to evaluate your website  and put a strategy in place to manage your blog. Finally, if you do not have a blog, you should start one now…

If you need help with business plans of marketing plans, please visit www.ebizplan.co.za.